Catherine Downes, MNZM, has won awards both for directing theatre, and her globetrotting one-woman shows about Katherine Mansfield. After launching theatre companies in Holland and the UK, she spent five years as artistic director of Christchurch's Court Theatre. On television, Downes played one of the flatmates in comedy Buck House, and starred as a doctor in Epidemic. Time in Australia saw her win a Sammy Award for film Winter of Our Dreams.

A powerfully executed work of art. The Listener, on Catherine Downes' one woman show The Case of Katherine Mansfield
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The Apple Tree

2016, As: Beth - Short Film

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The Intruder

1999, Actor - Film

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My Name is Jane

1999, Readings - Television

Shot on the run in 1998, My Name is Jane is built around the biggest deadline a filmmaker could face: the death of its subject. With a history of cancer in her family, musician and cancer sufferer Jane Devine proposed a film to director Amanda Robertshawe: one in which the personable Devine takes us through the process of making peace with her own passing — and the impossible task of preparing a son for life without her. The resulting documentary, surely among our most affecting hours of television, won repeat screenings and international plaudits.

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Virginia’s Candy

1993, Actor - Short Film

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Breaking Barriers

1993, Narrator - Television

John O'Shea was godfather to generations of Kiwi filmmakers; he was an inspirational force committed to bringing new perspectives to the screen. As Ngati actor Wi Kuki Kaa put it, "had he been a Māori, he would have been a kaumatua years ago". This documentary backgrounds O'Shea and his pioneering indie production company Pacific Films, ranging from his efforts to put Māori on screen, to banned 60s ads. The cast provides proof positive of O'Shea's influence — amongst the ex-Pacific staff interviewed are the late Barry Barclay, Tony Williams and  Gaylene Preston.

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Joyful and Triumphant

1993, As: Brenda - Film

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Stand By Your Man

1993, Narrator - Television

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Shortland Street

1991 - 1993,2005, Director, As: Eileen Horrocks - Television

Shortland Street is a fast-paced serial drama set in an inner city Auckland hospital. The long-running South Pacific Pictures production is based around the births, deaths and marriages of the hospital's staff and patients. It screens on TVNZ’s TV2 network five days a week. In 2017 the show was set to celebrate its 25th anniversary, making it New Zealand’s longest running drama by far. Characters and lines from the show have entered the culture — starting with “you’re not in Guatemala now, Dr Ropata!” in the very first episode. Mihi Murray writes about Shortland Street here.

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Star of David

1990, Narrator - Short Film

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Public Eye

1988 - 1989, As: Various Roles - Television

Gibson Group production Public Eye was inspired by the British series, Spitting Image. Latex puppets caricature topical personalities, mostly drawn from the world of politics (Ruth Richardson, Helen Clark, Winston Peters etc). Their foibles are duly skewered in fast-moving comic skits such as the 'Ruatoria Rasta' segment, 'The White Way' and 'Honky Tanga'. The wickedly grotesque puppets were based on drawings by cartoonist Trace Hodgson, and built by a team headed by future Weta FX maestro, Richard Taylor.

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The Quick Window

1988, As: Maria - Short Film

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Seekers

1986, As: Pauline - Television

This 80s TV series sees real estate agent Selwyn, TV producer Nardia (early turns from Temuera Morrison and Jennifer Ward-Lealand) and art student Ben (Kerry McKay) as a trio of young Wellingtonions drawn together by a mysterious invitation. At an antique shop dinner they discover they share a colourful birth mother, before becoming players in a game for a legacy of $250,000. Conceived by Brian Bell, Seekers was one of a series of teen-orientated dramas made in the mid-80s (along with Heroes and Peppermint Twist). The 16 episodes screened from February 1986.

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The Count: Profile of a Polemicist

1985, Narrator

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The Ray Bradbury Theatre

1990, As: Mrs Walterson - Television

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Waterloo Station

1983, Actor

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The Late Late Show

1982, As: Katherine Mansfield - Television

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A Most Attractive Man

1982, Actor

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Monkey Grip

1982, As: Eve - Film

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Winter of Our Dreams

1981, As: Gretal - Television

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A Country Practice

1983, As: Ellen Green - Television

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Epidemic - Hemi Te Koaka (First Episode)

1976, As: Karen Jones - Television

Part one of a four part thriller written by Keith Aberdein. In a small North Island town, a mysterious unmarked grave is believed to hold the remains of a tohunga who died ridding his people of a deadly epidemic. Now, an archaeological dig might be getting too close to that grave. A visiting doctor (Cathy Downes) arrives in town to find the locals in a state of agitation; the archaelogist (Martyn Sanderson) full of good intentions, but unaware of where his actions could lead; and relations between Māori and Pakeha strained as two cultures struggle to co-exist.

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Buck House

1975, Actor - Television

Famous as New Zealand television's first ever sitcom, Buck House was a rollicking and relatively risqué series that centred on the comings and goings of university students in a dilapidated Wellington flat — the eponymous 'Buck House'. Stars of the show included John Clarke, Paul Holmes, and Tony Barry (Goodbye Pork Pie). Despite (or more likely because of) its bawdy humour, occasional coarse language and alcohol abuse, the pioneering comedy sated the needs of many Kiwi viewers desperate for TV with identifiable local content and flavour.