When second channel TV-2 went on air in June 1975, Jennie Goodwin became a regular newsreader on the Two at Seven show. She became the first woman in New Zealand  — and the Commonwealth — to handle newsreading on a prime-time, nationwide bulletin. Goodwin first moved from radio into television in the mid 60s, initially working as a continuity announcer introducing each evening’s programmes.

When I started as a continuity announcer on AKTV-2 in about 1966 it was black and white, and you wore false eyelashes and really dark red lipstick. It was real theatre make-up. Judy Bailey recalls watching Jennie Forder on TV in The Australian Women's Weekly, 07 June 2013
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I Was There

2013 - 2014, Presenter - Television

Made for TVNZ’s Heartland channel, this series saw veteran newsreaders looking back at memorable moments in New Zealand history, from the 1960s to the 1990s. Covering both news events and popular culture, the show combined archive content and interviews with those who were there. Each decade was covered over a week, nightly from 7.30 - 10pm. The TV legends presenting the screen nostalgia included Dougal Stevenson (covering the 60s), Jennie Forder (née Goodwin) (70s), Tom Bradley (80s) Judy Bailey (90s) and Keith Quinn (who joined in the second season).

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Breakfast

November 27 2009, Guest newsreader - Television

Breakfast first aired in August 1997 on TV One. Screening five mornings a week over a three hour time slot, the programme mixes news and entertainment interviews with updates of news, sport and weather. The format of one male and one female presenter began with original hosts Mike Hosking and Susan Wood, and has included Pippa Wetzell and Paul Henry (who won controversy for Breakfast comments about an Indian politician), and Brit Rawdon Christie and Alison Pugh. A Saturday version of Breakfast was trialled in 2011, but abandoned the next year.  

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Here Is the News

1992, Presenter - Television

Once upon a time the Kiwi accent was a broadcasting crime, and politicians decided in advance which questions they would answer on-screen. Here is the News examines three decades (up to 1992) of Kiwi TV journalism and news presentation. The roll-call of on and off camera talent provides fascinating glimpses behind key events, including early jury-rigged attempts at nationwide broadcast, Dougal Stevenson announcing the 1975 arrival of competing TV networks, the Wahine, Erebus, Muldoon, turkeys in gumboots, and the tour - where journalists too, became "objects of hatred".

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Telethon

1976 and 1978, Presenter - Television

Telethon was a 24-hour live television spectacular aimed at securing donations from viewers for a charitable cause. The first, in 1975, launched the second channel (TV2) and raised over half a million dollars for St John's Ambulance. By 1981 Telethon had hit the $5 million mark. Along with willing local celebrities, volunteers and a receptive public, it attracted overseas stars: Basil Brush, Entertainment Tonight's Leeza Gibbons and Coronation Street's Christopher Quinton (who famously got together after the 1988 show). "Thank you very much for your kind donation!" 

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Two at Seven

1975, Presenter

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News at Six

1975 - 1980, Presenter - Television

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Reading the News

1966 - 1987, Presenter - Television

This archival compendium of Kiwi newsreaders in the hot seat compresses 21 years of footage into four minutes. Sixties BBC-style newsreader Bill Toft tells viewers about a court trial involving pirate station Radio Hauraki; Philip Sherry covers the 1970 shooting of four students at Ohio's Kent State University; and pioneering female newsreader Jennie Goodwin talks weather matters, using graphics and a roller-door style arrangement that now looks sweetly low-tech. The footage also includes the late Angela D'Audney, and long-serving news team Richard Long and Judy Bailey.