Globe-trotting Brit Katherine Kennard began modelling in Asia as a teen. After moving to NZ she studied acting at Unitec; by 2005 she had done four seasons on Street Legal, co-starring as Jay Laga'aia's legal (and ex-romantic) partner Joni Collins. The role would win her a 2003 Television award. After time out from acting, Kennard returned to play a heroin addict in Underbelly, and ex-wife to Shane Cortese's character on Nothing Trivial.

I liked the fact that she was more heart, even though Joni got portrayed as quite strong. It was very much in the beginning of my career ... I grew a lot within those four years. Katherine Kennard, on playing Joni Collins in Street Legal.

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Every Moment

2015, As: Hotel Guest - Short Film

Every Moment sees a hypothetical date taken to the extreme as a young would-be couple plan the life they might lead together. Aaron McGregor (Choice Night) plays the young hotel worker trying to mend — and win over — the broken heart of his workmate (Bree Peters — the murderous Dr Pania Stevens on Shortland Street). Based on a section of Thomas Sainsbury's play Hotel and shot in a single night in a working hotel, Every Moment was awarded the top prize at Tropfest 2015, and was also voted viewers' favourite. Peters won for best actress.

Underbelly NZ - Land of the Long Green Cloud

2011, As: Norma Fleet - Television

Nothing Trivial

2011 - 2013, As: Jo - Television

Nothing Trivial was a dramedy that kept score on the lives and loves of five friends in a pub quiz team called Sex on a Stick. The cast of City Lifers shifted to the suburbs and nearing middle age was led by Shane Cortese, Tandi Wright, Nicole Whippy, Debbie Newby-Ward and Blair Strang. Created by Rachel Lang and Gavin Strawhan, (the veteran writers behind Go Girls, Maddigan’s Quest, and Mercy Peak) the popular South Pacific Pictures production screened for three seasons on TV ONE. A fan-driven campaign saw NZ On Air fund a tele-movie to wrap up the series.

Nothing Trivial - First Episode

2011, As: Jo - Television

Nothing Trivial followed the lives and loves of five friends in their 30s and 40s, who compete in a weekly pub quiz. In this first 10 minutes of the debut episode, the Sex on a Stick team — played by Shane Cortese, Tandi Wright, Nicole Whippy, Debbie Newby-Ward and Blair Strang — gather at The Beagle to wrestle with John Wayne Bobbit trivia, and the trials of nearing middle age. The show was created by Rachel Lang and Gavin Stawhan (Go Girls). In the background piece, Lang explains how the show came to be, and argues Kiwis could give its professional actors more credit.

Spartacus: Blood and Sand

2010, As: Tertulla - Television

Bloodlines

2010, As: Christine Langsford - Television

This 2010 telefeature is based on the true crime story of South African-born Dr Colin Bouwer (played by Mark Mitchinson), who used his medical knowledge to poison and kill his wife Annette. A Dunedin doctor and policeman foiled his plot to get away with murder. Directed by Peter Burger (Until Proven Innocent), Bloodlines won gongs for actors Mitchinson and Craig Hall at the 2011 Aotearoa Film and Television Awards, and nominations for Burger's direction, Donna Malane and Paula Boock's script, and the work of actor Nathalie Boltt.

This is Not My Life

2010, As: Hope - Television

Sweetness

2009, As: Phaedra - Short Film

Little Angel

2009, As: Phaedra - Short Film

The Delphi Effect (aka Kiss Me Deadly)

2008, As: Kyra - Television

Legend of the Seeker

2008, As: Lara - Television

The Adventures of Voopa the Goolash

2007, As: Soli - Television

Keyhole

2006, Actor - Short Film

Orange Roughies

2006 - 2007, As: Maria Hanniford - Television

Orange Roughies was a 'border security' drama series following a Police and Customs task force led by Danny Wilder (Australian actor Nicholas Coughan). Made for TV ONE, the ScreenWorks production was a Kiwi attempt at the Aussie water police procedural, with the action transferred from Sydney to Auckland Harbour and CBD. Storylines included drugs busts, child trafficking, undercover ops and plenty of land-sea motorised chase action. Created by Scott McJorrow and Rod Johns, the script team was rounded out by Kristen Warner and series writer Greg McGee.

Treasure Island Kids: The Battle of Treasure Island

2004, As: Dr Philliman - Film

Hard Out - First Episode

2003, As: Astrid - Television

Middledon is invaded by aliens in this early 2000s teen series. In this first episode, Jeff and Noodle — 21st Century skater descendents of Terry Teo fed on What Now? ADD — stumble upon the conspiring Neo Corporation. Being the only ones to see Neo's nefarious plot, the duo must resist mind control (teen spirit anyone?), save the town, and stop their skate park being 'wasted' and turned into a mall. Future World fashion designer Benny Castles plays Jeff, Rawiri Paratene is Gran (!) Pekapeka, and Antony Starr's Stevo channels teen slacker icon Jeff Spicoli.

The Vector File

2002, As: Sonya - Film

Dark Knight (TV series)

2000 - 2001, As: Shameer - Television

Street Legal - First Episode

2000, As: Joni Collins - Television

Running an impressive four series, stylish crime show Street Legal centred around a struggling Auckland law firm, home base for unorthodox lawyer David Silesi (Jay Laga'aia), and sometime girlfriend Joni Collins (Kathleen Kennard). 'Ellis's Restaurant', the first episode made following the pilot, sees Silesi defending an ex-junkie on a possession charge, and facing off for the first time on screen against Sergeant Keens Van Dam (Charlies Mesure). The episode also sees the debut of Silesi's beloved 1944 Ford Jailbar, after his Ute unexpectedly ends up in pieces.

Street Legal

2000 - 2005, As: Joni Collins - Television

Over four seasons, Street Legal’s slick Kiwi take on urban crime and law genres racked up a stack of award nominations - including a 2003 NZ TV Award for best drama series. Although initially wary that the Auckland setting might alienate viewers, writer Greg McGee chose a Samoan lawyer (Jay Laga’aia) as his main character, to exploit the show’s inner-city Ponsonby setting (where cafe society bumps into Pacific Island immigrant culture). Other key characters included Silesi’s lawyer ex-girlfriend Joni, and her new partner Kees, an overstressed sergeant.

William Shatner's A Twist in the Tale

1998, As: Grizelda - Television

A Twist in the Tale was one of a series of kidult shows launched by The Tribe creator Raymond Thompson, after he relocated to New Zealand. The anthology series spins from a storyteller (Star Trek's William Shatner) introducing a story (often fantastical) to a group of children, some of whom appear in the tales. The show featured early appearances by many young Kiwi thespians, including Antonia Prebble, Chelsie Preston Crayford, Dwayne Cameron and Michelle Ang. Although the writing team were British, some of the directors and most of the crew were New Zealanders.

Street Legal - Pilot

1998, As: Joni Collins - Television

One of a trio of late 90s Kiwi crime-based pilots, Street Legal was the only one that would  successfully spawn a series - four series, in fact (though Kevin Smith vehicle Lawless saw two further tele-movies). The Street Legal pilot provides a stylish big city template for the show to come, as Auckland criminal lawyer David Silesi (Jay Laga-aia) enlists the help of an over- enthusiastic journalist (Sara Wiseman) in the hope of winning an out-of-court settlement over a hit and run case. Meanwhile Silesi's lawyer girlfriend smells something fishy - with good reason.

Young Hercules

1998, As: Luprea - Television

Xena: Warrior Princess

1996, As: Miss Skiros - Television

Shortland Street

1997, As: Lucinda Reeves - Television

Shortland Street is a fast-paced serial drama set in an inner city Auckland hospital. The long-running South Pacific Pictures production is based around the births, deaths and marriages of the hospital's staff and patients. It screens on TVNZ’s TV2 network five days a week. In 2017 the show was set to celebrate its 25th anniversary, making it New Zealand’s longest running drama by far. Characters and lines from the show have entered the culture — starting with “you’re not in Guatemala now, Dr Ropata!” in the very first episode. Mihi Murray writes about Shortland Street here.