Ex rapper Te Hamua Nikora cut his screen teeth as an early presenter of pioneering Māori youth show Pūkana (back when it was called Tūmeke). Later he became well known as a host of Kai Time on the Road, and as the bald-headed, big-hearted frontman of popular Māori TV karaoke shows Homai te Pakipaki and its successor Sidewalk Karaoke. In 2017 he teamed up with Laughing Samoan Tofiga Fepulea’i, for comedy show Hamu and Tofiga. Nikora has stood twice for the Mana Party in the Ikaroa-Rāwhiti electorate; he has hosted music and sports awards, Te Matatini, and is a motivational speaker and advocate for men’s health.

Working with Te Hamua Nikora on Homai te Pakipaki was fantastic. He loved presenting dangerous TV, and I love producing it. He is such a funny, talented guy — his interactions with our 'grassroots' whānua had so many classic moments. Homai te Pakipaki producer Erina Tamepo

More information

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Hamu and Tofiga

2017, As: Various roles - Television

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Sidewalk Karaoke - Series Two, Episode 12

2017, Presenter - Television

This Māori Television hit offers a down-home NZ Idol mixed with a little Fear Factor, as off the street talents sing three rounds of karaoke and try to win $1000. Hosts Te Hamua Nikora (Homai Te Pakipaki) and Luke Bird (The Stage - Haka Fusion) coax Lagitoa from Papatoetoe, Samantha from Pakuranga and Renee from Rotorua to belt out their favourite song. The show’s stripped back style allows lots of space for audience reactions (this time at Rotorua's night markets, and in Pakuranga). With encouragements in te reo and English, the contestants feel the fear and sing anyway.

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Sidewalk Karaoke

2016 - ongoing, Presenter - Television

Avoiding the bells and big notes of talent franchises like X Factor and Got Talent, the stage of this Māori Television series is Aotearoa’s streets and night markets. Passing punters hit the mic to see if they can make it through three karaoke rounds to win $1000. It replaced long-running studio karaoke show Homai Te Pakipakai, and is hosted by Te Hamua Nikora and Luke Bird. Created by Bailey Mackey (The GC) and Jonathon Urlich, the format sold to global company FremantleMedia. Raved The Spinoff writer Madeleine Chapman: "Sidewalk Karaoke is so simple it’s genius." 

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Homai Te Pakipaki - 2015 Grand Final

2015, Presenter - Television

The very last grand final of Homai Te Pakipaki sees ten finalists from across the motu come together to sing their hearts out, with the hope of taking home a $20,000 cash prize (plus phone package). Broadcast live, the raw talent karaoke contest is hosted by Brent Mio and 2008 series winner Pikiteora Mura-Hita, with help from Pakipaki veteran Te Hamua Nikora. The winner is decided by whānau, iwi and the viewers at home via text vote. The guests include 2014 winner Lee Stuart, band Sons of Zion and IDentity Dance Company. There are also short clips of past show highlights.

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Waiata Māori Music Awards

2010, Presenter - Television

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Unsung Heroes of Māori Music

2010 - 2014, Subject - Television

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Warrant of Fitness

2009, Presenter - Television

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Whare Pūoro

2009, Subject - Television

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He Karanga Matariki

2008, Narrator - Television

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Homai Te Pakipaki

2007 - 2011, Presenter - Television

Thanks partly to enthusiastic host Te Hamua Nikora, Homai Te Pakipaki soon won a keen following. Over nine years the sometimes rough and unrehearsed karaoke contest became a Friday night staple on Māori Television —  encouraging young and not so young to shine, as they performed and competed for a cash prize, sometimes to studio audiences numbering as high as 3000. Alongside Nikora, the band of hosts included award-winner Mātai Smith, 2008 series winner Pikiteora Mura-Hita and radio's Brent Mio. In 2016 Nikora returned to co-host follow-up show Sidewalk Karaoke

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Bromasters

2007 - 2008, Contestant - Television

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Maa Tātou

2005 - 2007, Subject - Television

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Kanohi ki te Kanohi

2004, Presenter - Television

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Wakamoemiti

2004, Performer - Television

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Kai Time on the Road

2004 - 2006, Presenter - Television

Kai Time on the Road premiered in Māori Television’s first year of 2003. It has become one of the channel’s longest running series. Presented largely in te reo and directed and presented for many years by chef Pete Peeti, the show celebrated food harvested from the land, rivers and sea. Kai Time traversed the length and breadth of New Zealand, and ventured into the Pacific. The people of the land have equal billing with the kai, and the korero with them is a major element of the show —  often over dishes cooked on location. Rewi Spraggon succeeded Peeti for the final two seasons.

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One Stop Tourist Shop

1999, Narrator - Television

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Pūkana

1999 - 2002, Presenter - Television

Debuting on TV Four as Tūmeke in 1999, children's show Pūkana was pioneering in its use of te reo. Given a new title when it moved to TV3 in its second year, it later began an epic run on Māori Television. Taking contemporary kids' culture cues, Pūkana features game shows, send-ups, talent quests and music. It emphasises ‘street’ rather than marae-style language. Made by company Cinco Cine, it has won three awards for best show in its category, and two nominations for children’s programme. Past presenters include Mātai Smith, Quinton Hita and Te Hamua Nikora.