Witi Ihimaera

Writer [Te Whānau a Kai]

With his 1973 book Tangi, Witi Ihimaera became the first Māori to publish both a novel and a book of short stories. Later his book The Whale Rider inspired a feature film which won international acclaim, and became one of the highest grossing 'foreign' titles released internationally in 2003. Ihimaera's work has also seen a number of television adaptations, including landmark big city tale Big Brother, Little Sister.

John Terris

Producer, Director

John Terris, QSO, moved from radio into television when the new medium hit New Zealand in the early 60s. Starting as a continuity announcer, he went behind the scenes, directing on the first seasons of TV staples Country Calendar and Town and Around. In 1978 the one time Hutt City mayor began 12 years as Labour MP for Western Hutt, including time as the deputy speaker. These days Terris heads advocacy group Media Matters.

Ray Schofield

Newsreader

Gisborne-born reporter/newsreader Ray Schofield added TV to his resume in 1962, when the NZBC launched a TV station in Dunedin. Schofield interviewed PM Keith Holyoake, tutored a teen Dougal Stephenson, and was rushed in to announce the death of John F Kennedy. He was also a champion shooter. Schofield left broadcasting in late 1970, and reinvented himself with data-processing company Databank. He died in 1997.

Jim Marbrook

Director

The films of Jim Marbrook include feature-length documentaries on speed chess maestros (2003 award-winner Dark Horse), psychiatric hospitals (Mental Notes) and environmental issues in New Caledonia (Cap Bocage). Marbrook also lectures in screen and television at Auckland University of Technology.

Clarke Gayford

Presenter

After graduating from New Zealand Broadcasting School, Clarke Gayford created student show Cow TV. Presenting gigs followed for music channel C4, United Travel Getaway, and Extraordinary Kiwis. In 2016 he swapped his microphone for a speargun to launch Fish of the Day, a Choice TV show about his lifelong passion. In 2017 Gayford became NZ’s 'first bloke', when partner Jacinda Ardern became Prime Minister.

Bailey Mackey

Producer [Ngāti Porou, Tuhoe, Rongowhakaata]

Bailey Mackey's first television job was as a reporter for Māori news programme Te Karere. Later, while Head of Sport for Māori Television, he created long-running sports show Code. Mackey established companies Black Inc Media and Pango Productions, and co-created high profile 2012 reality series The GC. He also sold the format for Pango's hit show Sidewalk Karaoke to global company FremantleMedia.

Mātai Smith

Presenter, Reporter [Rongowhakaata, Ngāi Tāmanuhiri, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Te Wairoa]

Mātai Smith began his screen career reporting on Marae. He was a long-running host of pioneering te reo children's show Pūkana and later co-hosted breakfast TV staple Good Morning (where he introduced te reo, and was hypnotised). Smith fronted popular Māori TV talent quest Homai Te Pakipaki, winning Best Presenter at the 2012 NZ TV Awards. He is currently Native Affairs’ Australian correspondent.

Paul Holmes

Broadcaster

Paul Holmes, KCNZM, helped change the face of New Zealand broadcasting. In 1989 the actor turned radio host began presenting primetime news and magazine show Holmes in spectacular style, when guest Dennis Conner walked out of his interview. Holmes balanced the TV show and a popular radio slot for 15 years, followed by a stint with Prime TV and current affairs show Q+A. He passed away on 1 February 2013. 

Anthony Stones

Designer

Anthony Stones worked in design for NZ television for over 20 years, with credits ranging from drama to current affairs. After five years as TV2's head of design, he returned to his English birthplace in 1983. Outside of television, Stones made well-known public sculptures in Aotearoa, the UK and China; he died in China in September 2016, aged 82.                    Image credit: Photo taken and supplied by Dave Roberts

Robin Scholes

Producer

Robin Scholes is one of New Zealand’s most experienced and respected producers. Her credits range from feature films (Once Were Warriors, Mahana, Mr Pip) to iconic TV shows (Magic Kiwis) and documentaries (Colin McCahon: I Am). In 1997 she was made an OBE for services to the film and television industry.