These New Zealanders - Gisborne

Television, 1964 (Full Length)

These New Zealanders was a magazine-style series produced by the National Film Unit and presented by Selwyn Toogood (one of his first television roles), that looked at six Kiwi locations in the 1960s. In this episode Toogood visits the North Island East Coast city of Gisborne. By 1964 improved road, rail and air links had brought about the end of Gisborne's isolation from the rest of the country. Here Toogood meets food processor James Wattie, and talks to the locals about the problems, achievements and hopes for the region.

Neighbourhood - Gisborne

Television, 2014 (Full Length Episode)

Meng Foon — longtime Gisborne mayor turned Race Relations Commissioner — plays tour guide to his hometown in this episode of local celebration show Neighbourhood. He introduces those that make up the diverse community he leads as mayor. Telling their stories are Samoan crop pickers temporarily in New Zealand, and a young Filipino woman making pancit on her birthday — before a local Indian couple share their stories of life following arranged marriage, and a Brazilian/American couple perform their music at a barbecue with their Kiwi kids.

Collection

The Horse Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection celebrates all things equine on New Zealand screens. Since the early days of the colony, horses have been everything from nation builders (Cobb & Co) to national heroes (Phar Lap, Charisma) to companions (Black Beauty) to heartland icons. Whether work horse, war horse, wild horse, or show pony, horses have become a key part of this (Kiwi) way of life.

Collection

Chinese in New Zealand Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

NZ On Screen's Chinese in New Zealand Collection contains many pearls — from a run of impressive documentaries, to comedies and dramas that skewer stereotypes and explore relationships across cultures. Identity, family, colliding values and 19th century goldminers all make regular appearances, but they're only part of a far bigger story. Plus check out this backgrounder by Race Relations Commissioner Meng Foon. 

Collection

Wellington

Curated by NZ On Screen team

In 1865, Wellington became the Kiwi capital. In the more than 150 years since, cameras have caught the rise and fall of storms, buildings, and MPs, and Courtenay Place has played host to vampires and pool-playing priests. Wind through our Wellington Collection to catch the action, and check out backgrounders by musician Samuel Scott and broadcaster Roger Gascoigne. 

Collection

The Music Festivals Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Music festivals aren’t all counterculture, mud and hangovers. As this collection can attest, there’s also flying missiles (including a tomato), fire poi and unpaid performers. And, of course, the music! AudioCulture, our sister site, can give you the complete lowdown on all the festivals (see Links), but watch them here: from Aotearoa’s very own Woodstock — Redwood 70 — to the groove of The Gathering. Follow Shapeshifter’s journey to Gisborne’s hot ticket, Rhythm and Vines, and see Courtney Love give Newsboy the glad eye at 1999's Big Day Out.

NZ Story - Meng Foon

Television, 2013 (Full Length)

In 2001 Meng Foon was the only serving New Zealand mayor to speak fluent Māori and Cantonese — and that was still the case when this documentary was made in 2013. Foon campaigns for a fifth term as mayor of Gisborne, appearing on local radio shows, door knocking and travelling long distances to connect with locals in small towns. Foon and his family talk about their Chinese heritage, and Foon reveals a lesser-known musical talent. Foon cultivated a deep relationship with the large Māori community in the Tairāwhiti district. In 2019 he resigned after 18 years as mayor.

Waka Huia - Meng Foon

Television, 2008 (Full Length)

When Meng Foon stood down as mayor of Gisborne after 18 years in 2019, he was Aotearoa's only mayor to be fluent in te reo Māori. In this subtitled te reo documentary, Gisborne locals praise Foon's ability to walk in both the Māori and Pākehā world. Kaumatua Charlie Pera admits some Māori were initially hesitant about a Chinese person speaking te reo, but they were soon won over by Foon's passion for their language and tikanga, and his advocacy of their issues. Foon, who was raised in Gisborne to market gardener parents, became Race Relations Commissioner in late 2019. 

Off the Rails - Rail Rider (Episode Nine)

Television, 2004 (Full Length Episode)

Marcus Lush goes "right up the guts" of the North Island from Wairarapa to Gisborne, in this episode of his award-winning romance with New Zealand's railways. He meets railcar restorers and recounts the murders by rail porter Rowland Edwards in 1884. Particular praise is reserved for the "spectacular and beautiful" Napier to Gisborne line (now mothballed) with its viaducts at Mohaka and Kopuawhara. The latter is on the site of a flash flood that killed 21 workers in 1938; it inspires an idiosyncratic Lush demonstration of Aotearoa's then 10 worst disasters.

Broken

Film, 2018 (Trailer)

This 2018 feature follows ex gang leader Logan (Josh Calles), who has ditched gang life to raise his daughter. When she is murdered by a rival gang, Logan is forced to choose between vengeance – and all-out gang warfare – or forgiveness. Also starring Dark Horse discovery Wayne Hapi, the Gisborne-shot drama marks the first feature directed by pastor Tarry Mortlock. It is a modern interpretation of a true story about a girl killed by a raiding party in the 1800s. Broken is presented by City Impact Church, although Mortlock says he "never set out to make a Christian movie for Christians".