Interview

Robyn Scott-Vincent: On her award-winning work with the Attitude series...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

After two decades as a print journalist, Robyn Scott-Vincent moved to television, where she reported for the primetime news, Top Half and Holmes. Since moving into producing and directing, she has worked on a number of documentaries including Kirsa. A Mother's Story, Cindy's Diary and Grammar Boys. These days Scott-Vincent runs Attitude Pictures, making award-winning series Attitude.

Interview

Martin Henderson: From Kiwi child star to Hollywood...

Interview – Ian Pryor. Camera and Editing – Alex Backhouse

After making his screen debut in 1988 on Margaret Mahy TV series Strangers, actor Martin Henderson spent three years on Shortland Street playing Stuart Nielsen, then moved on to Australia and later the United States. Since then he has acted everywhere from India to Sweden, and in everything from horror (The Ring) to musicals (Bride and Prejudice) to TV’s House MD. His work as Cate Blanchett’s disabled brother in drama Little Fish saw him nominated for an Australian Film Institute supporting actor award. Variety magazine called his performance 'a revelation'.

Interview

Waka Attewell: Cinematography highlights...

Interview – Ian Pryor. Camera and Editing – Alex Backhouse

Cinematographer Waka Attewell is something of a legend in the Kiwi film industry. From landmark 70s TV series Tangata Whenua, he has gone on to climb mountains with Sir Ed; shoot commercials, shorts and six and a half features  including the acclaimed Starlight Hotel — plus direct Ian Mune doco In the Shadow of King Lear

Interview

Rod Morris: A life filming in the wild...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

For over 25 years Rod Morris worked with TVNZ’s Natural History Unit and its successor NHNZ, documenting the wildlife of New Zealand. His passion for the natural world lead to his involvement in award-winning documentary series The Black Robin, and Wild South, as well as numerous one-off documentaries including The Devil’s Playground, Wild Asia, Ghosts of Gondwana and Dragons of Komodo. Since leaving NHNZ, Morris has worked on many wildlife books.

Interview

Rick Harris and Peter Rowley on Billy T James - Funny As Interview

Rick Harris began working as Billy T James' minder in 1986 — "I drove the car, I rolled the smokes, I made the tea." He reminisces about the fun times they had in this Funny As interview. Billy T James Show co-star Peter Rowley joins Harris, 19 minutes in. They discuss subjects such as: The real life inspiration behind Billy T's iconic laugh How Billy T loved to have fun, including spraying Rowley with a firehose while he was asleep in bed How Billy was able to get away with anything — says Rowley: "He had this lovely, almost little boy quality housed in this super talented adult" Billy being a "law unto himself", who disliked listening to advice Billy's concern for his daughter Cherie when his house was shot at, and their "immense" bond Note: For more on Billy T, check out Peter Rowley's solo interview for Funny As

Interview

Sarah Peirse: Multi award-winner…

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Award-winning actor Sarah Peirse is best known for her portrayals of two very different mothers — the ill-fated Honorah Rieper in Heavenly Creatures, and the disaffected sophisticate in Rain. Peirse’s first film was the 80s short Queen Street, followed by tele-feature A Woman of Good Character (aka It's Lizzie to those Close). More recently, she has appeared in tele-movies Bliss: The Beginning of Katherine Mansfield and Aftershock.

Interview

Te Radar - Funny As Interview

Te Radar (aka Andrew Lumsden) began his screen career competing on stand-up show A Bit More After 10. 

Interview

Susan Wilson - Funny As Interview

Alongside co-starring in classic office comedy Gliding On, Susan Wilson has acted in drama series Pioneer Women and a host of stage roles. This Funny As interview sees her touching on several subjects, including: Still being recognised for her Gliding On role as straight-talking office worker Beryl — which she played for five seasons Feeling lucky she got to play an early feminist role model on-screen — "Beryl usually solved the dilemma of the episode in some way, while all the men just couldn't cope" Lamenting the lack of diverse roles for women in the 1970s: "the girlfriend in the background, or the silly typist with the nail varnish on the desk" Working with playwright Roger Hall at Wellington's Circa Theatre: "He's always been able to capture whatever it is that's important that's going on around us" The  "amazing, genius comedy" of John Clarke, witnessed while acting with him onstage in Wellington

Interview

Julia Parnell: From Wayne Anderson and the Exponents to Loading Docs...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Julia Parnell runs Notable Pictures, and is the award-winning producer behind the offbeat Wayne Anderson: Singer of Songs; diversity series Both Worlds and Arranged; and music docos The Exponents and The Dragon Story. Parnell is also one of the driving forces behind successful online mini-documentary initiative Loading Docs.

Interview

Helene Wong - Funny As Interview

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story author Helene Wong grew up in 1950s Aotearoa, and has worked in the arts as a performer, writer, and film critic. She discusses her varied career in this Funny As interview, including: Growing up with radio comedy, being the class clown at school, and realising that you could make people laugh with voices and accents The university capping review being a revelation and a liberation — presenting an opportunity to deal with issues and being more than just "prancing about on the stage" How the introduction of television meant being able to see politicians — "their physicality, their flaws and their body language" – providing wonderful source material for satirists Working with Roger Hall, John Clarke, Dave Smith and Catherine Downes on university revue One in Five, and mimicking three-screen promotional film This is New Zealand to open the show Working for Prime Minister Robert Muldoon in the 70s as a social policy advisor – despite spending “the previous few years having a lot of fun satirising him”– and feeling that he had a "kind of dark force field around him" Reaching a turning point in comedy about Asians in New Zealand; Asians have started to "take back the power" and "as opposed to encouraging audiences to laugh at us, we’re now getting them to laugh with us"