Interview

Bridget Ikin: A champion for diversity and authenticity…

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Producer Bridget Ikin has long been a champion for women in the screen industry. Working on both sides of the Tasman, she has collaborated with many influential creatives including Jane Campion, Alison Maclean, Stewart Main, Australian director Sarah Watt, and writers Eleanor Catton and Emily Perkins.

Interview

Catherine Fitzgerald: The art of film producing...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Catherine Fitzgerald cut her teeth producing high profile short films. She collaborated with Taika Waititi on his Oscar-nominated short Two Cars, One Night  and with Vincent Ward on his feature Rain of the Children. More recently Fitzgerald produced two features with director Tusi Tamasese.

Interview

Alison Maclean: A gothic crush…

Interview and Editing - Gemma Gracewood. Camera - Mark Weston

Canadian-born to New Zealand parents, writer and director Alison Maclean helmed one of the most successful NZ Film Commission-funded short films of all time, Kitchen Sink, which debuted at Cannes and won eight international awards. A graduate of Elam School of Fine Arts, she has directed feature films Crush (which she also wrote) and Jesus’ Son. A director of commercials and television series including Sex and the City and Gossip Girl, Maclean divides her time between New York, Canada and New Zealand, and she is developing several feature films.

Interview

Geoff Steven: From feature filmmaking to network commissioning...

Interview - Clare O'Leary. Camera and Editing - Leo Guerchmann

Geoff Steven has been an integral part of the NZ television and film industry since 1975. He's made experimental films, commercial feature films, and documentaries. Steven has also worked as a network commissioner, and now has a job with the World Heritage Project.

Interview

David Blyth: Pushing boundaries...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Director David Blyth has created some of New Zealand’s most graphic and challenging movies dealing with horror, sexuality, and the sub-conscious mind. His career began as an assistant director on the film Solo, but it was his first feature Angel Mine which showed his interests in pushing the boundaries of filmmaking. In his time, Blyth has made a number of documentary features, directed episodes of Close to Home and created New Zealand's first horror film Death Warmed Up.

Interview

Alister Barry: Making political films from Mururoa 1973 to Hot Air...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Alister Barry is the filmmaker behind a series of provocative and politically charged documentaries, most of them self-funded. His first documentary Mururoa 1973 tackled nuclear testing, and saw him on a boat headed into the middle of a bomb test zone. Over the next four decades Barry has continued to make significant political documentaries including Someone Else’s Country, The Hollow MenWildcat and Hot Air. 

Interview

Robin Scholes: Producing the goods...

Interview, Camera and Editing – James Coleman

Robin Scholes is one of our most prolific feature film producers. Her credits include Once Were WarriorsBroken EnglishRainCrooked Earth, The Tattooist, and Mr Pip. She has also produced hundreds of hours of television, including Magic Kiwis, The Big Art Trip, Heroes, Greenstone, The Chosen and Burying Brian.

Interview

Nigel Latta: The psychology behind good television...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Nigel Latta is a clinical psychologist and popular TV presenter who has made a range of television shows exploring the human condition. His first foray into television was series Beyond the Darklands, which explored some of New Zealand’s worst crimes and the people behind them. He then hosted three series of Politically Incorrect Guides, which variously covered parenting, teenagers and grown-ups. His documentaries have taken him to Antarctica, up in helicopters, and led him to blow up various objects.

Interview

Roger Horrocks: Recognising film as an art form…

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Roger Horrocks is an academic and writer who has mentored many figures in the New Zealand screen industry. Horrocks began teaching film studies at Auckland University in the 1970s, at a time when film was looked down on by academics. He helped launch the Auckland Film Festival (the precursor to the New Zealand International Film Festival), and was a founding board member of funding body NZ On Air.

Interview

Don Blakeney: The early days of NZ film...

Interview - John Barnett. Director - Pat Cox. Editing - Alex Backhouse

Film producer Don “Scrubbs” Blakeney came from a background in finance. Returning from working overseas in the 1970s, he met pioneering filmmakers Grahame McLean and John Barnett. Blakeney had become disillusioned with the corporate world, and ended up drifting into the film industry as unit caterer on Sleeping Dogs. In 1979, his background in both finance and film made Blakeney the ideal first Executive Director of the newly-established New Zealand Film Commission. He later produced Geoff Murphy’s classic Māori western Utu. Veteran producer and industry colleague John Barnett is Blakeney's guest interviewer.