Woolly Valley - Series One Compilation

Television, 1982 (Full Length Episodes)

The magpie quardle oodled and the narrator uttered, "Welcome to Woolly Valley", in the intro to this children's TV classic. The low-tech puppet show with its rustic charm was familiar to a generation of kids who grew up in the 80s. It follows the lives of woolly-haired farmer Wally and his long-suffering wife Beattie, who live with talking ewe Eunice. Also featured is hippie Tussock, voiced by Russell (Count Homogenized) Smith. Woolly Valley marked an early piece of screenwriting by children's writer Margaret Mahy. This compilation is the entire first series.

Jo Seagar's Easy Peasy Xmas - First Episode

Television, 1998 (Full Length)

Continuing her quest to help you effortlessly delight your houseguests, Jo Seagar unveils her secrets for a perfect Christmas drinks party in this debut episode of Jo Seagar’s Easy Peasy Xmas. Canapés are the order of the day, as she makes tandoori egg sandwiches and homemade crostini with caviar, before getting into mini toad in the hole and spicy popcorn noodle mix. Punch is on the menu (God forbid the guests go without a drink) before Christmas nut pies top off the evening. The episode was the first of three; it was later followed by a one-off Easter special.

The City And The Suburb (part one)

Television, 1983 (Full Length)

In this two-part Lookout documentary from 1983, critic Hamish Keith explores how New Zealanders have housed themselves over the 20th Century. This first part builds to 1935: it begins in Auckland War Memorial Museum, with Keith asking how Kiwis would represent themselves if they were curators in the future. He presents the state house as the paramount Kiwi icon, and examines the journey from Victorian slums and Queen Street sewers to villas, bungalows and suburbia; plus the impact on housing of cars, consumerism, influenza, war, depression, and new ideas in town planning.

Mercury Lane - Series One, Episode 13

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

This 2001 Mercury Lane episode is based around pieces on author Maurice Shadbolt, and OMC producer Alan Jansson. With Shadbolt ailing from Alzheimer’s, Michelle Bracey surveys his life as an “unauthorised author” (Shadbolt would die in 2004). Next Colin Hogg reveals Jansson as the “invisible pop star” behind OMC hit ‘How Bizarre’ and more. The show is bookended by readings from Kiwi poets: Hone Tuwhare riffs on Miles Davis, Fleur Adcock reads the saucy Bed and Breakfast, and Alistair Te Ariki Campbell mourns a brother who fought for the Māori Battalion.

NZBC Network News - Daylight Saving Announcement

Television, 1974 (Excerpts)

Summertime daylight saving was reintroduced in New Zealand on a trial basis in 1974, for the first time since 1941. In this NZBC clip newsreader Bill Toft announces that clocks will be put forward one hour on 3 November. Despite concerns — dairy farmers fretting about having to rise in the dark all year; worries about effects on young body clocks, chooks' egg-laying and carpet fade —  the change became permanent in 1975. Citing benefits to recreation and tourism, the Government has since extended the daylight saving period twice, lastly in 2007.

Kōrero Mai - Series Five, Episode One

Television, 2007 (Full Length Episode)

Kōrero Mai used a soap opera (Ākina) as a platform to teach conversational te reo Māori. In this fifth season opening episode, Tini (Stephanie Martin) and Quinn (Kawariki Morgan) deal with the aftermath of the previous season's climactic car crash. Presenter Piripi Taylor introduces phrases like 'Ana e tā' (yeah man!). This season of the award-winning Māori TV show had 120 episodes, screening from Monday to Wednesday, then repeated. The directors are actors Rawiri Paratene (Whale Rider) and Rachel House (Hunt for the Wilderpeople), and cinematographer Simon Raby.

Dancing with the Stars - Temepara George excerpt (Series Four Final)

Television, 2008 (Excerpts)

In this excerpt from the final of the fourth season of Dancing with the Stars, two contestants remain: Silver Ferns netballer Temepara Bailey (then known as Temepara George), and Kiwis rugby league player Monty Betham. The clip recaps Bailey’s path to the final — including a netball injury scare — and showcases her foxtrot with dance partner Stefano Olivieri. Then it’s over to the judges to rate how the former World Netball Champion and Commonwealth Games gold medallist has performed on the dance floor. Bailey would go on to win the season. 

Dancing with the Stars - Backstage (Series One)

Television, 2005 (Excerpts)

Dancing with the Stars was a ratings hit for TV One. The opening season was named Best Entertainment/ Reality Programme at the 2005 Qantas Awards, and viewers switched on in droves to watch Kiwi celebrities tackling the challenge of ballroom dancing — and sometimes failing. In this brief collection of season one bloopers, host Candy Lane intentionally bumbles over her lines after examining Bernice Mene's outfit, Tim Shadbolt falls over (three times), and actor Shane Cortese gets a kick where it hurts the most. The montage is set to Supergrass song ‘Alright’. 

Dog Squad - Series Two, Episode One

Television, 2011 (Full Length Episode)

This long-running series tails working dogs and their handlers, who are helping protect New Zealand’s streets, borders, prisons and national parks. This opening episode of the second season sees dog squad member Dan "come a cropper", while chasing thieves; one prison visitor leaves with an unusual gift from inside (while other visitors are worried about their drugs from the night before); and Auckland Airport sniffer dogs snuff out some unwanted imports. Dog Squad's first two seasons were produced by Cream Media, shortly before the company was taken over by Greenstone TV.

Dancing with the Stars - Paul Holmes excerpt (Series Three, Episode Four)

Television, 2007 (Excerpts)

As the third season of hit show Dancing with the Stars began, broadcaster Paul Holmes was an underdog. His dance partner Rebecca Nicholson told Newstalk ZB that Holmes "dances like my dad". By mid-season Holmes knew that he needed to pull something out of the bag to stay in the running. The result: dancing the paso doble to Michael Jackson’s 'Thriller'. Judge Craig Revel Horwood called the routine "appallingly fabulous", as Holmes traded quips with the judges. In 2018 Stuff rated the homage to the King of Pop one of the show's most memorable moments.