Weekly Review No. 395 - Interview...Sir Peter Buck

Short Film, 1949 (Full Length)

This Weekly Review features: An interview with Sir Peter Buck in which Te Rangi Hīroa (then Medical Officer of Health for Maori) explains the sabbatical he took to research Polynesian anthropology, a subject in which he would achieve international renown; Landscapes: The Lakes at Tūtira sets the stunning scenery of the Hawke's Bay lakes to verse by James Harris; finally Southern Alps: RNZAF Drops Building Materials hitches a ride on a Dakota full of building materials being parachuted in to workers at Mueller Hut on Mount Cook.  

The World's Fastest Indian

Film, 2005 (Trailer, Excerpts, and Extras)

Inspired by the ageing Burt Munro — who took his home-engineered motorbike to America, and won a land speed record — this passion project was Roger Donaldson's first locally made film in two decades. Variety called it a "geriatric Rocky on wheels”; Roger Ebert praised Anthony Hopkins' performance as one of the most endearing of his career. The result sold to 126 countries, spent five weeks in the Australian top six, and became Aotearoa's highest-grossing local film — at least until Boy in 2010. Alongside an excerpt and making of material, Costa Botes writes about the film here. 

Four Shorts on Architecture

Short Film, 1975 (Full Length)

Director Sam Neill uses ‘Architect Man’ — a cartoon superhero trying to save Wellington’s buildings from mediocrity — to open this visual essay on contemporary Kiwi architecture. A montage of construction materials is followed by views on the high rise, woolshed, and Futuna Chapel. Renovation, DIY, prefabs and non-conformist design thinking are offered as hopes for the built environment’s future. Made by Neill when he was working at the National Film Unit, it was released in a shortened version (without the animation) in 1977, the same year he starred in movie Sleeping Dogs.

Artist

Emma Paki

Kiwi soul sister Emma Paki made her mark with 1993 classic 'System Virtue'. The song earned the Whakatane-born singer-songwriter a hat-trick (Most Promising Female Vocalist, Best Songwriter and Music  Video) at the 1994 NZ Music Awards, and also won her a live support slot for American songstress Sheryl Crow. Her award-winning debut album Oxygen of Love (1996) was a long time coming; it also included top five hit 'Greenstone', produced by Neil Finn. Paki began releasing further material in 2004. 

Beyond the Edge

Film, 2013 (Trailer)

Beyond the Edge tells the story of Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay’s first ascent of the world’s highest mountain. Award-winning director Leanne Pooley (Untouchable Girls) mixes archival material with recreations of the English-led 1953 Everest expedition. 3D cameras were used to put viewers in the crampons of the climbers, and evoke the endurance and dangers faced as they ventured to the top of the world. Beyond the Edge debuted at the 2013 Toronto Film Festival, where it was one of two runner-ups for the People’s Choice Documentary Award. 

Artist

Opossom

Following the demise of The Mint Chicks in 2010, lead singer Kody Nielson worked with Bic Runga, played in his brother Ruban's new band Unknown Mortal Orchestra and started his own solo project. Utilising influences ranging from jazz, lounge and Pacifica to 60s pop and psychedelica, he wrote and performed most of the material himself (with occasional contributions from Runga and his father Chris). He christened the project Opossom; album Electric Hawaii won Best Alternative Album at the 2012 NZ Music Awards.

Artist

Spats

Spats are better known as the band they soon became: The Crocodiles. Formed in mid 1977, originally as Les Hots, the eclectic act performed everything from jazz to doo-wop, as well as sellout shows at the Gluepot with Limbs Dance Company. In 1979 visiting US producer Kim Fowley (The Runaways) was won over by the band, especially the energetic 'New Wave Goodbye'. He encouraged singer Fane Flaws and company to change their name, and concentrate on more original material. 

Weekly Review No. 97 - Coal from Westland

Short Film, 1943 (Full Length)

This classic wartime newsreel profiles the coal mining towns of Westland. It compares the town of Rūnanga, where mining has brought prosperity and a strong community life, with Denniston, which is set in rocky, inhospitable land high up a West Coast mountainside. Its tone is patriotic: “Here then are the men who feed New Zealand with the raw material of industrial prosperity ... They work in the darkness of the mines, buried away from the fresh splendours of the air above them.” The Weekly Reviews were screened in cinemas 1942 - 1950.

Over Here

Television, 1992 (Full Length)

At any one time between mid 1942 and mid 1944, between 15,000 and 45,000 US servicemen were camped in NZ preparing for, and recovering from, war in the Pacific. The marines brought colour and drama to the austerity of home front life. Fifty years later this TV documentary used interviews, reenactments and archive material to explore the “American invasion”. Sonja Davies recalls a Wellington street fight kicked off by a racist insult directed at Māori, and her wartime pregnancy and romance (1,500 marriages ensued from “when the Americans were here”).

Great War Stories 1 - Mark Briggs

Television, 2014 (Full Length Episode)

This slot in TV3’s Great War Stories series looks at Kiwi conscientious objector Mark Briggs. In World War I imprisonment faced those who objected to doing their bit for King and country on moral grounds. In 1917 unionist Briggs and 13 others (including Archibald Baxter) were shipped to the front and made an example of via ‘Field Punishment No.1’, which saw the pacifists bound to a post in the open, then forced into the trenches. Archive material and art by Wellington's Bob Kerr depict the torture in this short documentary, which screened during 3 News in 2014.