Tilt to the Sun

Short Film, 1966 (Full Length)

Winter is going. This impressionistic take on spring in Aotearoa focuses on details of regeneration, from the mountains to the sea. Director Ron Bowie and cameraman Grant Foster capture signs of the season: ice melt like tadpoles under snow grass, gannets nesting on their Cape Kidnappers tenement, fern koru unfurling, kōtuku and royal spoonbills perched in Ōkārito trees like Dr Suess characters, willow buds and kōwhai flowers. And of course, lambs and daffodils. The camera aptly obeys the title to end. Patrick Flynn (Don’t Let it Get You) composed the score. 

Inquiry - The Late Mr Norman Kirk

Television, 1974

In September 1974, NZ reels from the premature loss of Norman Kirk — dead at 51 after just 20 months as prime minister. For this NZBC current affairs show, reporters Joe Coté and George Andrews head to the provinces to find out how Kirk is remembered by the ordinary men and women he valued so much. In less than stellar Labour strongholds in Central Otago and Taranaki, they meet people won over by a politician prepared to listen and treat them as equals. Their palpable affection is shared by Pacific leaders Gough Whitlam, Albert Henry and Michael Somare.

I Am a Dancer!

Television, 1990 (Full Length)

In 1989 dancer Douglas Wright returned home to choreograph and form his own company. This half-hour TV documentary, marking the launch of his work Gloria, looks back on a blossoming career that began at 21 — when he took up ballet to overcome a heroin addiction. After becoming a star with Limbs, Wright joined prestigious troupes in London and New York. Now, as opening night looms, he is acutely aware of the danger of pushing his dancers too hard as he fights to get the best out of them on an ambitious, demanding piece. Douglas passed away in November 2018.

Open Door - Pegasus Dance

Television, 2007 (Full Length)

The programme in the Open Door series follows a unique partnership between the Pegasus Unit — a special needs unit at Pakuranga college — and Auckland University Dance students, as they work together to produce a dance performance in just four weeks. The Pegasus Unit students blossom, and both groups of students learn from each other as the big day approaches.

Pictorial Parade No. 98 - Expanding Auckland

Short Film, 1960 (Full Length)

It’s possible that Auckland’s early 60s urban growth has never seemed bigger, brighter or bolder than it does in this breathless NFU newsreel. As the city encroaches ever further into the countryside, suburbs blossom and improved roads, motorways and the new harbour bridge keep the citizenry moving. In the CBD, construction is booming with a 23 storey civic centre on the way up and an obsession with bigger and better parking buildings. Improved infrastructure is also demanded — with upgrades to ports, railways, telephone exchanges and sewage facilities.

Artist

Snapper

Snapper is the Flying Nun combo with the big fat sound formed by one-time member of The Clean, Peter Gutteridge (also formerly of The Chills and The Great Unwashed). The driving and hypnotic ‘Buddy’, from the band’s eponymous debut EP, became an indie classic both in New Zealand and abroad, with fans including Stereolab and the Jesus and Mary Chain. Since the self-titled EP in 1989, they have released the album Shotgun Blossom (1992), a seven inch single ‘Gentle Hour’ (1993), and, more recently, the internationally-acclaimed A.D.M. album.

If You're in it, You're in it to the Limit - Bikies

Television, 1972 (Full Length Episode)

This notorious film looks at '70s bikie culture, focusing on Auckland's Hells Angels (the first Angels chapter outside of California). These not-so-easy riders — with sideburns and swastikas and fuelled by pies and beer — rev up the Triumphs, defend the creed, beat up students, cruise on the Interislander, provoke civic censure, and attend the Hastings Blossom Festival. After a funeral, Aotearoa's sons of anarchy head back on the highway. Bikies was banned by the NZBC — possibly due to the public urination, lane-crossing, chauvinism and pig's head activity.

The Otherside

Breaks Co-Op, Music Video, 2005

The electronica of Breaks Co-op’s 1995 debut Roofers offered few hints to the more organic sounds of their second album The Sound Inside. Its hit single ‘The Otherside’ is a sun-kissed anthem (and a NZ Music Awards Single of the Year) featuring lush acoustic guitar and a soulful vocal from Andy Lovegrove. Director Tim Groenendaal’s video is an idyllic summer road trip by Holden Kingswood through the Far North and down Ninety Mile Beach (with Zane Lowe’s backseat role prefiguring the step back he would take from the band as his UK radio career blossomed).

Interview

Michael Heath: Vampires, mad scientists, and forgotten artists…

Interview and Editing – Ian Pryor. Camera – Jess Charlton

Michael Heath's imagination has spawned movies bursting with murder and mayhem, as well as lyrical tales of childhood and unheralded artists. Heath's work ranges widely – some of his films are lyrical, comical and murderous all at the same time. His scripts include two contenders for New Zealand's first horror film (Death Warmed Up and Next of Kin), plus an affectionate adaptation of Ronald Hugh Morrieson classic The Scarecrow, which was the first Kiwi movie invited to the Cannes Film Festival. In recent years Heath has blossomed from writer into director.

Eagle vs Shark

Film, 2007 (Trailer, Excerpts, and Extras)

Taika (Boy) Waititi's first feature is an offbeat comedy about two lonely misfits and their attempts to find love. Lily (Loren Taylor) is a shy fast-food cashier with a crush on clueless gaming geek Jarrod (Conchord Jemaine Clement). When Lily crashes Jarrod's fancy dress party wearing a shark costume and impresses the self-styled ‘Eagle Lord' with her gaming prowess — excerpted here — she gets her man. But their budding romance is sorely tested by Jarrod's obsession with a childhood nemesis. Empire called the film, "a comic delight destined for cult adoration."