Million Dollar Tumour

Television, 2006 (Full Length)

In Million Dollar Tumour Dave Bowman narrates the “very personal tale” of his battle with cancer. The small town policeman was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2005, aged 35. Bowman took on funding agency Pharmac and the bureaucracy of the public health system to try to get a treatment drug subsidised for himself and other sufferers. Although his efforts partly prevailed, Bowman died in mid 2006, after this Inside New Zealand documentary screened. Directed by Dave Crerar (Here to Stay), Million Dollar Tumour won Best Documentary at the 2006 Qantas TV Awards.  

Angela D'Audney - A Tribute

Television, 2002 (Full Length)

In this tribute to veteran broadcaster Angela D'Audney — broadcast soon after her death in 2002 — colleagues and friends recall her tenacity and confidence. After nearly 40 years working in television, D'Audney earned the title of New Zealand's "first lady of broadcasting". D'Audney was 18 when she joined the NZ Broadcasting Corporation as an announcer in 1962; she went onto become one of the country's first female TV newsreaders. She recalls losing jobs, the thrill of reading live news and the scandal she faced when she appeared topless in 1982 TV drama The Venus Touch

Today Live - Angela D'Audney

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

In an emotional Today Live interview from June 2001, Susan Wood talks to pioneering newsreader Angela D’Audney about her diagnosis with a brain tumour four weeks earlier, resulting surgery and the prospect of radiotherapy. D'Audney talks about the highs and lows of her considerable career, and attributes her success as much to tenacity as talent. Paul Holmes reminisces and offers support, there’s archive footage of her from AKTV-2 in 1968; and she is given the final word in what will be her last television appearance. Angela D’Audney died on 6 February 2002.

Asia Downunder - Series 13, Episode 17

Television, 2006 (Full Length)

This Asia Downunder programme explores a sensitive subject for the Asian community: problem gambling. Street Talk takes the issue to the people, to canvas a range of views. Charlie ASH guitarist Mailee Mathews is profiled, as is comedian Jerome Chandrahasen. Asian films in the Film Festival are reviewed, and in the kitchen it's chicken with dried fenugreek leaves. Finally in a touching tribute, Malaysian-born actor Yvonne Tan is interviewed during her final battle with a brain tumour.

Series

Asia Downunder

Television, 1994–2011

Asia Downunder was a weekly magazine show for and about the Asian population in New Zealand. The long-running series featured a range of stories covering news, profiles, arts, business and travel, with occasional specials devoted to a single topic. The show was produced and presented by Korean-born Melissa Lee (later a National Party MP) and a small team of reporters. After debuting on TV One in 1994 as Asia Dynamic, it was retitled Asia Downunder in 1999. Altogether the show ran for 19 seasons. Later producers included Chris Wright and Kadambari Gladding.

Cathy Campbell

Reporter, Presenter

Cathy Campbell became the first woman in New Zealand to anchor a sports programme, after joining TV One’s Sportsnight in 1989. The longtime news and sports reporter moved into newsreading, and later ran PR and events company Cathy Campbell Communications. She died on 23 February 2012, after a two-year battle with a brain tumour.

Angela D'Audney

Newsreader

The career of iconic broadcaster Angela D'Audney spanned four decades. After a pioneering frontwoman role on 1974 regional show Look North, D’Audney went on to present news programmes, long-running arts slot Kaleidoscope, and act in teleplay The Venus Touch. In 2001 she was diagnosed with a brain tumour; D'Audney died the following year, after co-writing autobiography A Wonderful Life.

Ewen Gilmour

Comedian, Presenter

Surely the most famous comedian to rise from West Auckland, Ewen Gilmour won the first Billy T award in 1997, and a devoted following. The longtime petrolhead had begun making regular appearances on TV show Pulp Comedy in the mid 90s; there would also be live performances in Paris, Ireland, Montreal, and across the length of New Zealand. Gilmour passed away in his sleep in early October 2014.

Shavaughn Ruakere

Actor [Taranaki, Te Atiawa]

Aged 18, New Plymouth-raised Shavaughn Ruakere landed her first screen job: five years presenting on children’s show What Now?. Then she moved to London, and won a gig co-presenting What Now?'s English equivalent, SM:TV Live. Since presenting for C4 back home, Ruakere has moved increasingly into acting. From 2011 she did a three year stint on Shortland Street as nurse Roimata Ngatai. Later she was a solo Mum with a brain tumour (in Darryl: An Outward Bound Story) and a Māori woman in 1914 Auckland (in miniseries When We Go To War). In 2016 Ruakere was the Los Angeles reporter for Seven Sharp.

Dave Fraser

Composer

In the 1970s and 1980s, the multi-talented Dave Fraser brought his multiple musical talents to score everything from features and National Film Unit documentaries to television dramas and commercials. Image credit: Alexander Turnbull Library, 1/2-215042-F (Detail)