Artist

The Crocodiles

Evolving from the group Spats, The Crocodiles released their first album Tears in 1980. It included the classic song of the same name. Managed by one-time Split Enz member Mike Chunn, the eclectic pop band underwent many line-up changes in its short lifespan. There was no lack of talent in the turnover, with bandmembers that included singer Jenny Morris, future music video maestro Fane Flaws and future film composer Peter Dasent — plus acting legend Bruno Lawrence, who was replaced by Ian Gilroy (The Swingers). The Crocodiles called it a day in 1981, soon after the final lineup recorded the song 'Hello Girl'.  

Collection

Kiwi Comedy On TV

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection celebrates Kiwi comedy on TV: the caricatures, piss-takes, and sitcoms that have cracked us up, and pulled the wool over our eyes for over five decades. From turkeys in gumboots and Fred Dagg, to Billy T, bro'Town and Jaquie Brown. As Diana Wichtel reflects, watching the evolution of native telly laughs is, "a rich and ridiculous, if often painful, pleasure." 

Hello Girl

The Crocodiles, Music Video, 1981

This was the last music video made by 80s band The Crocodiles before they left NZ for Australia. The clip features new band members Jonathan Swartz, Barton Price (who later found success with Aussie band The Models), and future solo star Rikki Morris, then aged 20. Singer Jenny Morris is in leopard print and pink lycra, and Rikki wears a very 80s combo of high-waisted white pants and argyle sweater, as the band clown around in a supermarket (now a Hutt Valley McDonalds). Dave Dobbyn makes a cameo appearance dressed in drag as Morris's mother.

Any Day of the Week

The Crocodiles, Music Video, 1979

Possibly channelling the final rooftop concert by The Beatles (a number of The Crocodiles were big Beatles fans), this up-on-the roof video was self-produced by The Crocodiles. It marked Fane Flaws first directing credit — made, with fine business sense, for a song that was never released as a single. The location was near Parliament, with the high shots coming from an unauthorised trip to the top of a nearby Government high-rise. Vocalist Jenny Morris and drummer Bruno Lawrence play ill-matched lovers — as they would do in the video for breakthrough Crocodiles hit 'Tears'.

Tears

The Crocodiles, Music Video, 1980

Band Spats demonstrated they could write a catchy song with 'New Wave Goodbye'. But it needed the addition of singer Jenny Morris, a name change to The Crocodiles and a track called 'Tears' for the public to really sit up and take notice. In the video, drummer Bruno Lawrence hangs around next to a shady lamp post while Morris passes by, and the band's bubblegum coloured costumes positively shine against an all white set. After reaching number 17 on the NZ singles charts, 'Tears' won the APRA Silver Scroll songwriting award for 1980.

Telephone Lover

The Crocodiles, Music Video, 1980

The Crocodiles were on tour supporting their second album, Looking at Ourselves, when this video was shot in Dunedin. Though he’d left the touring unit, Fane Flaws still provided material and was co-writer of ‘Telephone Lover’. Dunedin’s old Bing Harris Sargood building provides the backdrop for most of the video, while the ‘live’ sections were shot at the now-defunct Shoreline Tavern. Dunedin cameraman Peter Janes directed and filmed the segment for regional news programme The South Tonight.

Dirty Creature

Short Film, 1995 (Full Length)

This tale of a girl, her dog and a strange old man sees the tomboyish Daphne gleefully ruining a wedding, before her imagination unleashes monstrous forces. Made under the umbrella of Peter Jackson's company Wingnut Films in the early days of FX maestros Weta, Dirty Creature features contributions from many longtime Jackson cohorts, including Weta's Richard Taylor. Directed and co-written by Grant Campbell (who worked on Bad Taste), the film shares the anarchic, child-like spirit — plus a little of the crimson food colouring — of Jackson's early features.

Hillary: A View from the Top - The Early Years

Television, 1997 (Excerpts)

These excerpts from part one of Tom Scott’s award-winning series on the life of Edmund Hillary look at his early years. Ed reflects on his youth as a gangly Auckland Grammar student, beekeeping, and a school trip to Ruapehu that sparked a “fiery enthusiasm” for alpine adventure. Coupled with a young man’s frustration with his “miserable, uninteresting life”, this passion for the hills soon led to a solo ascent of Mount Tapue-o-Uenuku as an RNZAF cadet — famously climbed on a weekend’s leave from Woodbourne base— and a 1947 ascent of Mount Cook, with his mentor Harry Ayres.

Holmes - Christmas Party: Ingham Twins Interview

Television, 1997 (Excerpts)

'Our people' at Holmes' 1997 Christmas party included tearaway teenage twins Sarah and Joanne Ingham. Earlier that year the sisters had stowed away on a Malaysian container ship after Sarah had fallen for a sailor. The 18-year-olds made global headlines when they jumped overboard off the Queensland coast, supposedly swam through shark and croc-infested waters and spent two weeks in the bush, before being found and deported back to Nelson. As Holmes tries to elicit soundbites the notorious lasses display the laconic style that made them Kiwi folk heroes.

New Wave Goodbye

Spats, Music Video, 1978

This infectious clip marks one of the only Kiwi music videos to have been made independently of state television in the 1970s. Spats toured their eclectic brand of music from Blerta's old bus, then found fame after morphing into The Crocodiles. In this track vocalist Fane Flaws demonstrates a TV screen can make a valid performance tool, and regular Spats accomplices Limbs Dance Company add some moves of their own. The video was directed by Flaw's old Blerta colleague Geoff Murphy while Spats was on tour. 'New Wave Goodbye' ultimately ended up on Crocodiles album Tears.