To Help a Crippled Child

Short Film, 1972 (Full Length)

This 1972 NFU documentary looks at the care of children born with physical disabilities. Aimed at families with ‘crippled’ children, the film was directed by Frank Chilton for the Crippled Children Society (now CCS Disability Action). Parents, doctors, teachers and field officers are shown engaging with children and young adults at home and in the community, from spring-loaded splints for spina bifida patients to Māori stick games as therapy for cerebral palsy. It is introduced by Mrs New Zealand 1970, Alison Henry (whose son was born with a congenital foot defect).

Songs from The Inside - Series Three, Episode One

Television, 2015 (Full Length Episode)

This acclaimed Māori Television series saw Kiwi musicians teaching bars behind bars — working with prisoners to compose and record songs, drawn from their life experiences. In this opening episode from the third season, Anika Moa, Ladi6, Scribe and Troy Kingi head to Christchurch’s men’s and women’s prisons. For Moa, Ladi6 and Scribe, Christchurch is their "music whakapapa". For Scribe it is a reminder of earthquake tragedy. The jail itself revives memories of childhood visits to his father (an upbringing which the two explored in 2015 play The White Guitar).

Making Music - Hinewehi Mohi

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

In this episode from a series for secondary school music students, singer Hinewehi Mohi recalls the controversy that followed her Maori language rendition of 'God Defend New Zealand' at the 1999 Rugby World Cup. She talks of her immersion in music at school and its importance to her following the birth of her daughter with cerebral palsy (and the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre this inspired her to establish). As a songwriter who doesn't play an instrument, she explains the origins of 'Kotahitanga' — her Maori language-meets-dance pop hit with Oceania in 2002.

Artist

Hinewehi Mohi

Hinewehi Mohi (Ngāti Kahungunu/Ngāi Tūhoe) released her debut single 'Kai U' in 1992. The first Oceania album (1999), made with British musician Jaz Coleman (Killing Joke), fused Māori harmonies and dance beats. It went double platinum, sold overseas and yielded single 'Kotahitanga'. The same year Mohi won headlines after singing the national anthem in te reo at an All Blacks game. Recorded with the Auckland Chamber Orchestra, her 2013 album Raukatauri - Te Puhi o te Tangi marked 20 years of making music. Mohi founded the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre, after her own daughter was born with cerebral palsy.

Brothaz

Nesian Mystik, Music Video, 2003

“Hello my name is ...” This starts out as a happy video for the song ‘Operation Fob’, but the smiles soon disappear as the band walk away from set and head through Auckland city. They head for a community centre for a meeting of ‘Brothaz Anonymous’. The skeptical janitor watches from the doorway as band member and ‘bros’ gets up and express. The band then plays a series of group therapy games and eventually, bust out the guitar and ask the janitor to join in. End result? Brothaz in arms. ‘Brothaz’ was the fifth single from the hit Polysaturated album.

Gaylene Preston

Director

Gaylene Preston has been making feature films and documentaries with a distinctive New Zealand flavour and a strong social message for over 30 years. In 2001 she was the first filmmaker to be made a Laureate by the Arts Foundation, recognising her contribution to New Zealand film and television.

Simon Baumfield

Cinematographer

Simon Baumfield is a multi-award-winning cinematographer, whose work includes ensemble TV series Insiders Guide to Love and horror movie The Irrefutable Truth about Demons.