Collection

Black Gold

Curated by NZ On Screen team

For a small country from the edge of the world, achievements on the Olympic stage are badges — silver fern-on-black — of national pride: precious moments where we gained notice (even if it was Mum’s anthem playing on the dais). This legacy collection draws on archive footage, some rarely seen, to celebrate the stories behind Kiwis going for gold.

Triumph of the Human Spirit

Television, 1996 (Full Length)

Fronted by Paul Holmes, this doco looks at the New Zealand Paralympic team at the 1996 Paralympics in Atlanta. It was the most successful team to date with a haul of nine gold medals, six silver and four bronze (and 44 personal bests). Triumph focuses on several disabled Kiwi athletes, from their arrival in the States to victory on the track, in the pool and on the field. The first Paralympics were held in Rome in 1960 with just 400 competitors. In Atlanta 3,500 athletes competed, 35 of them kiwis. Triumph broke ground screening in a primetime slot on TV One.  

Attitude Special - The Journey of the Wheel Blacks

Television, 2008 (Full Length Episode)

Attitude is a weekly series looking at the issues and interests of people living with a disability. This Attitude special follows the Wheel Blacks wheelchair rugby team over four years, as they prepare for the upcoming 2008 Paralympics in Beijing. Four Wheel Blacks were on the production team of Attitude at the time; player and original Attitude co-host Curtis Palmer presents the programme. The documentary follows the team from their 2004 gold medal win at the Athens Paralympics, through various international competitions in the lead-up to Beijing.

50 Years of New Zealand Television: 4 - Winners and Losers

Television, 2010 (Full Length Episode)

This fourth episode in Prime’s series on Kiwi television history series charts 50 years of sports on TV. Interviews with veteran broadcasters are mixed with clips of classic sporting moments. Changes in technology are surveyed: from live broadcasts and colour TV, to slo-mo replays and CGI graphics. Sports coverage is framed as a national campfire where Kiwis have been able to share in test match, Olympic, Commonwealth and World Cup triumphs and disasters — from emotional national anthems and inspirational Paralympians, to underarm deliveries, snapped masts and face-plants.

Interview

Robyn Scott-Vincent: On her award-winning work with the Attitude series...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

After two decades as a print journalist, Robyn Scott-Vincent moved to television, where she reported for the primetime news, Top Half and Holmes. Since moving into producing and directing, she has worked on a number of documentaries including Kirsa. A Mother's Story, Cindy's Diary and Grammar Boys. These days Scott-Vincent runs Attitude Pictures, making award-winning series Attitude.

Interview

Chas Toogood: Documenting some of life's great moments...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Chas Toogood is an award-winning documentary producer and director whose work has showcased the strength and determination of the human spirit. He began his career as a news journalist and then moved on to a series of high profile documentaries including the Legends of the All Blacks series, Mark Inglis documentary No Mean Feat, and Sir Peter Blake – The Boy From Bayswater. Toogood has gone on to direct episodes of Wild Coasts with Craig Potton and Coast New Zealand.

No Mean Feat

Television, 2002 (Full Length)

In 1982 bad weather left Mark Inglis and Phil Doole trapped for 13 days in a crevasse, close to the summit of Aoraki/Mt Cook. No Mean Feat chronicles the path taken by Inglis since — from rescue, and the discovery he would lose his lower limbs, to his reinvention as research scientist, winemaker, and paralympic cyclist. In 2001 cameras followed Inglis back to Cook, where he attempted another climb using custom-designed prosthetic legs. Topped off by stunning aerial footage of Mt Cook, No Mean Feat won best documentary at the 2003 NZ TV Awards.

Long White Cloud

AttitudeLive, Music Video, 2015

Made for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, this video mixes Kiwi landscapes with images of disabled athletes and performers, showing what they are capable of. The song’s lead vocalists, Natalie Te Paa and Cam Dawson, are both blind. Helping out behind the scenes are Callum Martin (The Checks), Leza Corban (Strawpeople) and ex-Split Enz members Eddie Rayner and Mike Chunn. As well as being an unofficial anthem for the Rio Olympics, the song aims to raise awareness of the 25% of New Zealanders who live with some form of disability.

Twelve Days Of Glory - The Forgotten Athletes

Television, 1993 (Full Length)

Presented by Paul Holmes, this documentary follows the team of 13 Kiwi competitors at the Barcelona 1992 Paralympics. Swimmer Jenny Newstead won four gold medals and broke world records, but for this small team the focus was on personal bests as they headed into a more professional era. There's triumph and disappointment, mixed with the message that these were elite athletes competing strongly against the rest of the world. The lessons learned in Barcelona would lead to a much stronger showing four years later in Atlanta. 

Series

Attitude

Television, 2005–Ongoing

Attitude is a weekly series that addresses the issues and interests of people living with a disability. The high energy series launched in 2008, with a strong thread of advocacy journalism. Attitude has a number of team members who themselves have a disability, including all the onscreen researcher/reporters. Much of Attitude's content has been loaded onto online hub Attitude Live, which launched in 2013 and later beat 86 countries to win a World Summit Award in the 'inclusion and empowerment' category — plus praise for digital innovation.