Collection

The Janet Frame Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Writer Janet Frame (1924 - 2004) is an icon of New Zealand literature; her 'edge of the alphabet' use of language has seen her acclaimed as "one of the great writers of our time" (San Francisco Chronicle). This collection celebrates Frame's life and work on screen, from applauded Vincent Ward and Jane Campion translations to a rare TV interview with Michael Noonan.

Woolly Valley - Series One Compilation

Television, 1982 (Full Length Episodes)

The magpie quardle oodled and the narrator uttered, "Welcome to Woolly Valley", in the intro to this children's TV classic. The low-tech puppet show with its rustic charm was familiar to a generation of kids who grew up in the 80s. It follows the lives of woolly-haired farmer Wally and his long-suffering wife Beattie, who live with talking ewe Eunice. Also featured is hippie Tussock, voiced by Russell (Count Homogenized) Smith. Woolly Valley marked an early piece of screenwriting by children's writer Margaret Mahy. This compilation is the entire first series.

Nia's Extra Ordinary Life - 09, Deserted Island (Episode Nine)

Web, 2014 (Full Length Episode)

Nia is an ordinary girl living in the Northland town of Tinopai. In this ninth episode, a trip to the wharf to help her Dad with some fishing provides a chance for Nia to think about how she'll feel when her best friend Hazel leaves. An imagined stay on a desert island (with a penguin for company) is interrupted when the boys turn up, seemingly up to their usual mischief. Nia's Extra Ordinary Life was made by the team behind Auckland Daze; they began filming a second series in 2015.

Joe's World on a Plate - First Episode

Television, 2013 (Full Length Episode)

In this bilingual cooking series made for Māori Television, chef Joe McLeod calls on a career that has taken him to 36 countries to present international dishes combined with NZ ingredients and elements of traditional Māori cuisine. In this debut episode, he adapts one of his mother’s favourite dishes from his childhood as he substitutes salmon for her Taupō trout, and serves it with pūhā, dried kawakawa leaves and a simple Māori herb sauce. The programme’s main course is liver sautee with a tangy lemon herb sauce, and the dessert is a peach and plum trifle.

Woodenhead

Film, 2003 (Trailer and Excerpts)

Innocent Gert, who works in a rubbish dump, can't believe his luck when he's ordered by his boss to take his beautiful mute daughter, Princess Plum, to meet her prospective husband. The two set off on a mythical quest through a fairytale Far North landscape. On the way they encounter freaks and monsters, and experience danger and romance. In an unusual reversal, the voices and music for Woodenhead were all recorded before filming. This surreal second feature from Elam art school grad Florian Habicht took Aotearoa to the arthouse with unprecedented weirdness and wonder.

Fasitua Amosa

Actor

The son of a Canterbury Presbyterian minister, Amosa moved to Auckland as a teen. He got early acting experience via drama productions at Sunday school and Kelston Boys' High, before formal training at Unitec. In 2004 Amosa won a plum role as a ghost (and narrator) on TV's Insiders Guide to Happiness. He has since acted on Harry and Go Girls. Amosa was on the creative team of web series satire Auckland Daze (he played an unfunny comedian); and Daryl - An Outward Bound Story. He was one of the suspects on web whodunnit Alibi. The Auckland theatre actor has also voiced many adverts and documentaries.

George Henare

Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Hine

On stage, actor George Henare has played everyone from Lenin and King Lear, to Snoopy and Dracula. On screen, his extensive resume spans 70s TV landmark The Governor, 90s classic Once Were Warriors, and an award-winning role on 2010's Kaitangata Twitch.

Grant Bowler

Actor

Grant Bowler cemented his place in Kiwi television history by playing charismatic Outrageous Fortune bad boy Wolf West. Long based out of Australia, the self-described 'Aussiwi' has become increasingly visible on American screens since 2008, backing movie work with roles in shows Ugly Betty, True Blood  and Lost.

Nic Sampson

Actor, Writer, Comedian

Wellingtonian Nic Sampson was barely out of high school when he landed a plum acting role on TV show Power Rangers Mystic Force. Then he found himself working in a bakery for two years, after failing to find more acting jobs. The silver lining came when Sampson turned to writing and performing comedy plays, which eventually led to a head writer role at Jono and Ben. Sampson has since got back in front of the camera for The Brokenwood Mysteries (playing Constable Sam Breen), Funny Girls and Step Dave. He was named Best Newcomer after for his stand-up show at the 2016 NZ International Comedy Festival.

Bruce Phillips

Actor, Writer

Bruce Phillips’ long stage career encompasses six acting awards, directing, and a “brilliantly funny” starring role as Uncle Vanya. On-screen, his CV runs to more than 30 roles, including playing fighter pilot Richard Dalgleish on TV series Country GP, a womanising dentist on Roger Hall comedy Neighbourhood Watch, and Prime Minister Geoffrey Palmer in 1994 miniseries Fallout.