Hunger for the Wild - Series One, Episode Three (Mokihinui River whitebait)

Television, 2006 (Full Length Episode)

This award-winning lifestyle series took Wellington chefs Al Brown and Steve Logan out of their fine dining restaurant kitchen, and off on a mission to put the local in 'locally sourced' kai. In this episode it's wild food on a wild river — whitebaiting on the Mokihinui. Brownie gets a primo 'stand' and coaster advice; and Steve gets some Green Fern lager and meets a Department of Conservation ranger who tells the whitebait's perilous life story and nets a grown-up: a kokopu. Then it's riverside fritters with beurre blanc sauce and asparagus, washed down with a glass of pinot gris.

What Now? - Te Reo Episode

Television, 2011 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of the kids' TV institution celebrates te reo — one of Aotearoa's three official languages — for Māori Language Week. The July 2011 show opens at its Christchurch studio with a haka from Spreydon's kura kaupapa; from there the kōrero — and gunge — flows freely. Bursting with edifying energy it includes the show's trademark games, and The Wobblies, LOL and Family Health Diarrhoea. Australian Idol Stan Walker is the star guest and sings 'Loud' with Camilla the chimp, and NowTube visits an 80s What Now? (Steve Parr, Frank Flash et al). Tu meke tamariki!

What Now? - 30th Birthday Show

Television, 2011 (Full Length Episode)

NZ telly's longest running children's show turns 30 with a two hour, live extravaganza — far removed from its modest beginnings as a half hour pre-record in 1981. Current hosts Charlie, Johnson and Gem are joined by a parade of past presenters who reminisce, and compete to find the show's best decade. Masterchef finalist Jax Hamilton provides snacks, celebrities send greetings; and — in amongst the cupcakes, gunge, fart jokes and mayhem — the programme enters its fourth decade as an institution, watched by the children of its original audience.

What Now? - 25th Birthday Celebration

Television, 2006 (Excerpts)

In 2006, TVNZ’s long running children’s show celebrated 25 years on air — and Christmas — with a “Merry Birthday” special. In these excerpts, current presenters (including Tamati Coffey) are joined by a cavalcade of former hosts including Jason Fa’afoi, Carolyn Taylor, Props Boy, Shavaughn Ruakere and original anchor Steve Parr (with the same moustache a quarter of a century later). The emphasis is firmly on studio ordeal with guests gunked, foamed and asked to drink the undrinkable; and then there’s the raw fish — a step too far for at least one of them.

The Erin Simpson Show - Bloopers (Series Five)

Television, 2013 (Excerpts)

The Erin Simpson Show was a staple of TVNZ’s after school programming over five years from 2009, with host Erin Simpson a familiar face to a generation of Kiwi kids. The magazine-style show covered everything from sport and gaming, to fashion and celebrities. This compilation of bloopers from the final season sees presenters fumble lines and get the giggles: Michael Lee follows a recipe instruction too literally, and hits himself with a conker; Erin falls over some words and mentions being "great-a-full"; and comedy duo Chris & Guy clown around, and ham it up as fashionistas.

The 4.30 Show - Bloopers

Television, 2015 (Excerpts)

This after school show on TV2 delivered celebrities, music, sport, fashion and interviews for the YouTube generation. In the show's closing stages it was presented by Eve Palmer (The Erin Simpson Show) and Adam Percival (What Now?). In this 2015 bloopers reel Adam and Eve fluff their lines, get the giggles and show off impromptu dance moves. Eve goes cross-eyed, while Adam gets a swear word beeped out and attempts to play ‘April Sun in Cuba’ on a recorder. The 4.30 Show morphed into The Adam and Eve Show in 2016, before heading to ZM radio the following year.  

Series

What Now?

Television, 1981–present

What Now? is a long-running entertainment show for primary school-aged children. Filmed before a live studio audience on weekend mornings, What Now? is a New Zealand TV institution; it was the first TV show to have live phone-ins. The series is known for its challenges that sometimes result in participants being 'gunged'. A roll-call of presenters includes Steve Parr, Danny Watson, Simon Barnett, Jason Gunn, Michelle A'Court, Tamati Coffey, Antonia Prebble, and more. 'Get out of your Lazy Bed' by Matt Bianco is the theme song memorable to generations of Kiwi kids.

Kotuku

Short Film, 1954 (Full Length)

This short National Film Unit documentary travels to Westland to meet the kōtuku or white heron. In Aotearoa, the kōtuku is known for its beauty and scarcity (the bird’s only NZ breeding colony is near Okarito Lagoon). The black and white film joins the ranger to go whitebaiting, as kōtuku arrive in spring. Kōtuku’s special place in Māori mythology is recounted, and legendary ornithologist Robert Falla checks out chicks in a crowded ponga fern nest. Directed by John Feeney, the film premiered in Christchurch in front of Queen Elizabeth, on her Coronation Tour.

Norwester - Wind of Contrasts

Television, 1990 (Full Length Episode)

This documentary, made by TVNZ’s Natural History Unit (now NHNZ), charts the progress of the nor'west wind from its formation in the Tasman Sea across the Southern Alps to the Canterbury Plains and the east coast of the South Island. Along the way it dumps metres of precipitation on West Coast rain forest and snow on the Alps, then transforms to a dry, hot wind racing across the Plains. The film shows the wind's impact on the ecosystem and farming and muses on the mysterious effect it can have on humans. It screened as part of the beloved Wild South series.  

This Town - First Episode

Television, 2013 (Full Length Episode)

This acclaimed TV series heads to Aotearoa’s heartland, dispensing with narration or a city slicker presenter so that local personalities can represent themselves. The opening episode travels to the West Coast to meet the 'Coasters' who live there: from publicans, prospectors and bushmen, to sheila truck drivers, knitting drag queens and musical theatre directors. The Dominion Post’s Karl du Fresne wrote of the show: "Producer Melanie Rakena has done a superb job seeking out engaging characters with interesting stories and allowing them to tell them in their own way."