Celebrating Bic

In mid-November 2016, Bic Runga became the youngest inductee into the NZ Music Hall of Fame — she also released new album Close Your Eyes. Bic's career is a remarkable one: from early work ('You', Silver Scroll winner 'Drive' and globe-spanning single 'Sway') to later musical collaborations ('Winning Arrow', 'Tiny Little Piece of My Heart'). Check out other sides of Bic (which is pronounced 'Bec') in this Spotlight: including more beautiful songs, an extended Homegrown interview from 2005, and an early gig as a presenter on Music Nation

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Sway

Music Video, 1997 (Pop)

The third single from Bic Runga's 1997 debut album Drive got to number seven in the NZ charts, 10 in Australia and 26 in Ireland. It nudged the UK charts at 96, and was included on the soundtrack of hit comedy American Pie. Directed by UK photographer/video director Karen Lamond and made to showcase Runga internationally, the video shows the singer shyly stalking the hipster of her 90s dreams, as he stocks the shelves of an Italian deli. Back at her place, the camera pulls back for an unexpected end. An earlier video for the single also exists, directed by Kiwi talent Joe Lonie.

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Homegrown Profiles: Bic Runga

Television, 2005 (Documentary, Music)

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles features singer/songwriter Bic Runga, who burst onto the New Zealand music scene in 1997 with her record-breaking debut album Drive. Since then Runga has had both local and international success and released two further hit albums, Beautiful Collision and Birds. Runga talks about growing up in a musical household (her mother and two older sisters are all singers), the success of Drive, and her "difficult second album", which was released a full five years after her debut. 

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You

Music Video, 1994 (Pop)

Love Soup was a high school duo formed by singer-songwriter Bic Runga and guitarist Kelly Horgan. After coming third in the Smokefree Rockquest, they were picked up by Trevor Reekie’s Pagan Records. This video is about all that is extant from Love Soup, as they were overtaken by Runga’s burgeoning solo career. Shortly to be signed by major label Sony, her debut hit single (and APRA Silver Scroll winner) ‘Drive’ was only months away. Aged just 19, Runga already looks and sounds remarkably assured as she sings about a lost friendship, to a mystical CGI cipher.

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Music Nation - First Episode

Television, 1995 (Music)

Kiwi music show Music Nation introduced young presenter Bic Runga to the nation, shortly before she took her microphone skills in another direction. In this debut episode, the show's 'field reporter' Ian Hughes (aka Hugh Sundae) interviews winners at the 31st NZ Music Awards, while Runga introduces many of the accompanying videos. There are double helpings of Supergroove, who took away five awards on the night, and Che Fu sings a thank you speech a cappella. But there are murmurs of discontent over Purest Form taking the public vote for best single.

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Tiny Little Piece of My Heart

Music Video, 2012 (Pop)

For fourth album Belle (2011), Bic Runga found new collaborators, including brothers Kody and Ruban Nielson (The Mint Chicks), with Kody becoming Belle's producer and Runga’s partner. ‘Tiny Little Piece of My Heart’ was the first result, and opening track; The Herald's Lydia Jenkin called the girl group style number "an irresistible piece of pop, deceptively effortless in its spacious groove and sweet keyboard riffs". The black and white video for the jaunty song about moving on, sees Runga lolling about on a bed with a vintage camera. It was directed by fashion photographer Oliver Rose. 

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Get Some Sleep

Music Video, 2002 (Pop)

The first single from Bic Runga’s chart-topping second album Beautiful Collision is — according to AudioCulture's profile of the singer — an autobiographical song about the stresses of touring. 'Get Some Sleep' peaked at number three in the New Zealand charts, and was the best-selling song by a local artist in 2002. Two videos were made; the version aimed at local audiences sees Runga roaming Aotearoa in a mobile radio station playing CDs and records, greeting fans and generally broadcasting happy vibes: Yes...we do believe Bic may be having fun.  

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Drive

Music Video, 1997 (Pop)

When Bic Runga broke out in 1996, 'Drive' was the lead single from her hit album of the same name. Opting to stay with the simplicity of her original demo clearly paid off: the song earned then 20-year-old Runga the 1996 APRA Silver Scroll Songwriting Award. Director Justin Pemberton wisely creates a video that matches the song. Alternating black and white with colour provides a moody feel without drawing attention to itself, leaving Runga to deliver a delicate performance on a song that would have a major impact on her career.

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Winning Arrow

Music Video, 2005 (Pop)

Directed by Darryl Ward, this gorgeously shot video boasts a stellar cast of players and backing vocalists, including Anika Moa, Shayne Carter, Neil Finn, Anna Coddington and drummer Rik Gooch. All were contributors to Runga's third album, Birds. Ward achieves a delicate, occasionally light-hearted tone, as the Kiwi all-star band performs Runga's mellow message of finding hope amidst glumness. "Casting a line to you ..."

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Bursting Through

Music Video, 1998 (Pop)

The second single from singer-songwriter Bic Runga's critically acclaimed debut album Drive, 'Bursting Through' is a spare but quietly insistent plea for emotional warmth. The video finds Runga elegantly coiffeured and styled in a white gown with a black guitar. The setting favours bleached whites and pale blues, and water surrounds her in a myriad of forms — dripping, pooled, condensed. But there’s the promise of sunlight and succour as well. Co-director Melanie Bridge would later help found multi-national commercials company The Sweet Shop.

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Listening for the Weather

Music Video, 2002 (Pop)

After Bic Runga's debut album Drive sold — and broke — a bunch of records, another five years passed before she found time to perfect her follow-up. Fears it would join the long list of disappointing second albums proved unfounded: Beautiful Collision scored three NZ Music Awards, and became the biggest-selling local release of 2003. The album's third single 'Listening for the Weather' spent 20 weeks in the Kiwi charts. Shot mostly on DV and Super 8mm, the video offers a snapshot of life on tour: dressing rooms, concert halls, road signs...and lyrics about home not being too far away.  

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Through the Eyes of Love

Television, 1998 (Documentary)

Kiwis are often accused of not being very good at expressing their feelings. This documentary (made for TV One's Work of Art programme) offers striking evidence to the contrary, using some of our favourite love songs as proof. A roll call of New Zealand's best-known musicians and songwriters talk here candidly about love, and play some of the songs inspired by their experiences. The result is a film that shines a light on love Kiwi-style, and provides a fascinating survey of New Zealand pop music from the last 30 years along the way.

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Suddenly Strange

Music Video, 1997 (Pop)

This single, one of many from singer-songwriter Bic Runga's debut album Drive, is a recognition that a relationship is over. Runga's bittersweet lyric is a declaration of independence that never quite manages to be unequivocal. Nominated for best video at the 1998 New Zealand Music Awards, Wayne Conway's clip finds her in a box in a number of locations around Auckland — enclosed while a slightly surreal life goes on around her, until she musters the energy to walk out into the world.

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Fish Skin Suit

Television, 2000 (Fantasy, Drama, Māori)

While playing at the beach with their grandmother, two children witness an Elvis impersonator walk out of the sea. They believe he's the "fishman" lover of a female taniwha, Hine Tai. Magic realist mayhem — and tragedy — ensues as the stranger stirs up the life of their whanau in the quiet fishing village. The fable, written by Briar Grace-Smith and directed by Peter Burger, received six nominations at 2002 NZ TV Awards, winning Best Drama, and Camera. It screened on TV3 and features the Bic Runga song 'All Fall Down'.