Sima Urale, Samoa’s first female filmmaker, has brought touching stories of Pacific peoples to the screen, often from an NZ outsider’s point of view. Urale credits her film success to determination and dealing with social issues close to her heart. Her lauded shorts (O Tamaiti, Still Life) were followed by her 2008 feature debut Apron Strings. Urale is head tutor at Wellington's NZ Film and Television School.

I always strive to make a film that says what I want it to say. If I didn’t have anything to say, I wouldn’t make films. Sima Urale
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Women of the Pacific

2012, Writer, Director

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Apron Strings

2008, Director - Film

In Samoan-born director Sima Urale's first feature, two mothers from two very different Aotearoa cultures must find the courage to confront the secrets of the past in order to set their sons free. Hard-working Lorna runs an old-fashioned cake shop in Otahuhu and lives with her unemployed son Barry. For Anita, the star of an Indian TV cooking show, things come to a head when her son Michael decides to meet her estranged sister Tara, who runs a no-frills curry house. Apron Strings debuted in the Discovery Section, Toronto Film Festival, 2008.

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Coffee and Allah

2007, Director

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Hip Hop New Zealand

2003, Director - Television

"E tu stand proud, kia kaha say it loud", Dean Hapeta's lyrics typify the socio-political messages in NZ's early rap music. The four elements of hip hop: breakdancing, graffiti, DJ-ing and rap are examined through interviews with key players in the hip hop scene (including King Kapisi, Che Fu, Upper Hutt Posse). A recurring theme in the Sima Urale-directed documentary is that local hip hop artists are less interested in the "girls, booze and bling" school of hip hop, and more interested in using their art to make a political statement. 

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The Legend of Johnny Lingo

2003, As: Hoku

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The Living Room - Series One, Episode Two

2002, Director, Presenter - Television

This early episode from the award-winning arts series drops in on the Urale sisters — directors Sima and Makerita and publicist Maila — in the living room of their Lyall Bay fale. The prolific Samoan-Kiwi siblings visit local haunts, discuss work, and brother Bill (aka King Kapisi) is mentioned in dispatches. Other Kiwi creatives featured include 'nu jazz' practitioner Mark de Clive-Lowe playing at Cargo in London; designer Ross Stevens building his challenging Happy Valley shipping container conversion; and Cannons Creek beatbox king Dougie B breaking it down.

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The Living Room - Series One, Episode Eight

2002, Director - Television

Brought to you from "the Samoan Embassy" (in reality, the Naked Samoans' motel room) this episode of The Living Room follows the comedic theatre troupe during their time at the Edinburgh Fringe, before retreating to the wild west coast of the South Island where acclaimed cinematographer Alun Bollinger reflects on his diverse life and career. Also featured is the first 'proper' exhibition of Illicit artists on K' Road, (featuring the late Martin Emond) and a visit to small town Mangaweka, setting for surrealist short film Little Gold Cowboy. 

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The Living Room - Series One (Flight of the Conchords)

2002, Director - Television

This is an early screen showing for "music comedy phenomenon" Flight of the Conchords. The excerpts from arts show The Living Room follow Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement from Wellington to performances at the 2002 Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Dreams of fame come face to face with budget digs, Jonah Lomu and anonymity, which the duo face with their droll resolve. Larry Pritchard (Taika Waititi) takes on the role of manager, pre Rhys Darby. The next year the Conchords were nominated for a Perrier Award, en route to an HBO TV series and cult stardom.

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The Living Room - Series One (excerpts)

2002 - 2003, Director - Television

A magazine show with an edge, The Living Room did for arts television production what Radio With Pictures did for NZ music — it ripped open the venetian blinds, rearranged the plastic-covered cushions, and shone the sun on Aotearoa’s homegrown creative culture. Often letting the subjects film and present their own stories, it was produced for three series by Wellington’s Sticky Pictures, who also made follow-up arts showcase The Gravy. These excerpts from the first series show a calvacade of local talent, including an early Flight of the Conchords screen outing.

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Mercury Lane

2002, Director - Television

Produced by Greenstone Pictures, Mercury Lane was a story-driven arts show that screened late on Sunday nights on TV One, from 2001 until 2003. Each hour-long episode of this 'front-person free' show included a cluster of short documentaries covering a wide range of subjects including poetry, visual art, music and performance. 

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Still Life

2001, Writer, Director - Short Film

Director Sima Urale's follow-up to her Venice-winning short O Tamaiti swaps a Samoan child's eye view for that of an elderly Pākehā couple. In this moving confrontation with the taboos of aging, the husband struggles to care for his ailing wife and refuses their children's demands that they move into care. Exquisite attention to details and tender performances mark this tale of love accommodating the reality of death. Still Life was the first Kiwi film to take the top short award at the Montreal Film Festival; it also got a Special Mention at the Locarno fest in Switzerland.

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Sub-Cranium Feeling

1998, Director - Music video

The award-winning promo for the debut single by hip hop artist King Kapisi (Bill Urale) is a family affair: bookended by shots of his two-year-old son, directed by his sister Sima and produced by another sister, Makerita. The song is a plea to his Samoan people to remember their pre-colonial past: “feed your kids not the church”. Filmed underwater at Wellington’s Kilbirnie Aquatic Centre, the video has islander Kapisi swimming through a sea of lava-lava. It won gongs at 2004’s BFM, Mai Time, and Flying Fish awards and an NZ On Air 1000 Music Video Celebration nod.

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Skitz - 'Best Of' Excerpts

1997, As: Various Characters - Television

Skitz was a popular long-running sketch-based comedy that ran for four series from 1993 - 1997. This selection of excerpts contains sketches from the final season of the Gibson Group satirical show famous for its broad, take-no-prisoners humour and memorable characters and catch phrases. The wacky Semisi family and their 'fresh off the boat' antics inspire mirth and groans in equal measure and filmmaker Sima Urale is enjoyably ludicrous as the terrifying Aunty Mele. Jemaine (Flight of the Conchords) Clement and members of the Bro' Town posse also feature.   

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Velvet Dreams

1997, Director - Television

A homage to Dusky Maiden images as well as a playful take on the low art of velvet painting, Sima Urale’s Velvet Dreams provides a tongue-in-cheek exploration of Pacific Island stereotypes. Part detective story, part documentary, an unseen narrator goes in search of a painting of a Polynesian princess that he has fallen in love with. Along the way he meets artists, fans and critics of the kitsch art genre, as well as the mysterious Gauguin-like figure of Charlie McPhee. Made for TVNZ's Work of Art series, Velvet Dreams played in multiple international film festivals.

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An Immigrant Nation - Searching for Paradise

1996, Narrator - Television

This episode of Immigrant Nation features former Holidaymakers guitarist Pati 'Albert' Umaga, part of the first generation of New Zealand-born Samoans. Umaga's parents arrived in Wellington in 1950 as part of Samoa's Great Migration. Encouraged to speak Samoan at home, and English outside the house, Umaga drifted away from his family and culture, before finally coming to the realisation that Fa-a Samoan - The Samoan Way - has much to offer him in how he operates in Kiwi society. Umaga goes on to use his music as a way to reach Samoan youth.

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O Tamaiti

1996, Writer, Director

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Swimming Lessons

1995, As: Social Worker - Television

Swimming Lessons is the story of jaded swimming coach Jim Sadler (Marshall - Came a Hot Friday, The Navigator - Napier) and a spirited seven-year-old delinquent who comes under his instruction. The troubled Samoan boy is a potential champion, but the challenges of training him force the coach to confront his own failings in life: one as seemingly straight as the pool's lane line. Directed by Steve La Hood, Swimming Lessons won two NZ TV Awards. It screened as part of Montana Sunday Theatre and was the TV producing debut for Philippa Campbell.

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Skitz

1993 - 1997, As; Various Characters - Television

Skitz was a popular long-running sketch-based comedy that screened for four series. Populated with memorable characters and catch-phrases, and broad, take-no-prisoners humour, it won Best Entertainment Programme at the 1996 NZ TV and Film Awards. A particular favourite in its arsenal of regular characters was the Semisi family with their 'fresh off the boat' antics inspiring mirth and groans in equal measure. Skitz featured seasoned comedians such as Jackie Clarke, as well as new faces at the time, including Jemaine Clement offuture Flight of the Conchords fame.