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Clips (2)

  1. Part one of two from this full length episode.

  2. Part two of two from this full length episode.

Synopsis

This showcase for Arthur Baysting's sleazy, comedic alter-ego Neville ("on the level") Purvis ("at your service") is notorious for containing the first use of the f-word on NZ television. As a result, Baysting was banned and crossed the Tasman to find work (an irony given the show's anti-Australian jokes). The controversial utterance no longer exists — extant segments include a launch by PM Rob Muldoon, a tour of Avalon, a performance by Limbs Dance Company (including Mary-Jane O'Reilly), a visit to the Close to Home set, a garden gnome fan, and some Mark II Zephyr worship.

Credits (11)

 Aidre McEwen
 Arthur Baysting
 Danny Faye

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Produced by

 Television One (TV One)

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Related Titles (7)

 Close to Home

Television, 1975 (Full Length Episode)

Close To Home in front of the cameras

 Tears

Music Video, 1980

Neville's creator Arthur Baysting co-wrote this hit song

 Bugger - Toyota Hilux Commercial

Television, 1999 (Full Length)

More controversial use of language

 For Arts Sake - Mary Jane O'Reilly

Television, 1996 (Full Length)

Documentary about the founder of Limbs Dance Company

 Terry and the Gunrunners - Episode Two

Television, 1985 (Full Length Episode)

Another TV appearance by Sir Robert Muldoon

 Forever Tuesday Morning

Music Video, 1984

Music video filmed in the corridors of Avalon

 Nambassa Festival

Television, 1979 (Full Length)

Neville Purvis appeared at this festival

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Included in:

 Politics

Quotes

Packed with trendies this place, more denim than a bistro bar on a Friday Night. 
Neville Purvis, a sort of urban Fred Dagg, a cross between Dame Edna Everage and Ian Kirkpatrick, if you can imagine such a thing.