Faifua Amiga won acclaim with Kingpin - his first film role - at the age of 14. Four years later, he took centre stage in the Samoan feature film Flying Fox in a Freedom Tree.

At the heart of it is a terrific performance from Faifua Amiga. His Pepe is a soul in torment, at war with himself and with the alienating cultural ideals of the colonising Palagi. Costa Botes, reviewing Flying Fox
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D.S.B.

1997, As: Racehorse - Short Film

Two young men (played by Michael Sengelow and Kingpin's Faifua Amiga) spend an afternoon drinking, boasting about their sexual prowess, scaring some roving evangelists — and accidentally summoning Satan, after their turntable starts playing records backwards. Satan (played for some of the time by screen legend Ian Mune) promises them everything they desire, so long as they can offer him the blood of a virgin in an hour. A comedy featuring possessed voices, jokes about bodily fluids and a Devil who can change genders. Note: some content may offend. 

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Tala Pasifika

1995, As: Matt - Television

Tala Pasifika was a pioneering Pacific Island drama series produced by He Taonga Films and mentored by Ruth Kaupua and the late Don Selwyn. NZ On Air and the NZ Film Commission backed the project. Of eight short dramas; the first six screened on TV One as part of Tagata Pasifika in 1996 and another two screened in 1999. Seen as an opportunity to extend the cultural diversity of local TV drama, it was the first drama series dedicated to Samoan culture in NZ and a showcase for emerging Samoan screenwriters, directors and actors.

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Tala Pasifika - A Day in the Life

1995, As: Matt - Television

Tala Pasifika was a pioneering Pacific Island drama series; this award-winning episode is one of six films that screened on TV One in 1996. It's an emotional short drama about teenage school friends Siosi (Johnny La'ulu), Matt (Faifua Amiga) and John (Robert Luisi), who are awaiting their School Certificate results. On the day he receives his grades, Siosi is beaten by his father (Ene Pataia). The following day, he discovers a tragedy has occurred within his circle of friends. This acts as a catalyst to resolve his own troubles at home.

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Dead Certs

1995, As: Head Honcho - Television

Made for Montana Sunday Theatre, Dead Certs provides rare starring roles for talents Rawiri Paratene and Ginette McDonald. Paratene won a Television Award for his acting, and also co-wrote the script (with director Ian Mune), which he began writing on a Burns Fellowship. Paratene plays Hare Hohepa, whose dreams of a winning bet that will allow him to escape his down'n'out existence take an unusual turn: his friend Martha (McDonald) expires after some drinks, then returns in ghostly form to encourage him to keep betting. So begins a dream run at the TAB.

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Flying Fox in a Freedom Tree

1990, As: Pepe - Film

On the Samoan island of Sapepe, the rebellious, pranksterish young Pepe (Faifua Amiga) rejects his imported Christianity and declares himself a descendant of the old gods, setting himself on a path of alienation and conflict. In this excerpt, he leads a burglary of his father's store and burns down a church on the streets of Apia. Adapted from two works by Albert Wendt and shot with a local and largely amateur crew, Martyn Sanderson's first feature is emboldened by vivid cinematography and Kingpin-star Amiga's unforced charisma in the lead role.

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Ruia Taitea: The World is Where We Are

1990, As: Manu, As: Manu - Film

This documentary looks at the life and work of acclaimed author Patricia Grace. Filmed at home, on marae and in classrooms, Grace discusses her writing process, her Hongoeka Bay upbringing, her children’s books, criticism of her work, and her Māori identity and belonging to the land (a theme of her then-recently successful novel Potiki). In particular she affirms the importance of writing from experience. The film features interviews with publishers and friends, and excerpts from Grace's stories are read and dramatised, including At the River, The Hills and Mutuwhenua.

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E Tipu E Rea - Thunderbox

1989, As: Junior - Television

A teenage boy's unorthodox relationship with his father (Wi Kuki Kaa) is explored as he learns about hypocrisy in this E Tipu e Rea edition, written by Bruce Stewart and starring Faifua Amiga as Thunderbox Junior. After establishing a reputation as a highly successful director of commercials, this was Lee (Once Were Warriors) Tamahori's first attempt at the helm of a longer drama. "You tend to get a bit of experience making people laugh when you direct commercials,' he said. "One thing I'm sure of is that people like to laugh at themselves."

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E Tipu e Rea - Variations on a Theme

1989, As: Tuku - Television

In a nod to his theatre training, Whale Rider actor Rawiri Paratene (then better known as a presenter on Play School) unveils three stories to a marae audience. A bored schoolboy (Faifua Amiga) banters with a sarcastic teacher; a musical number features a prostitute (Rena Owen) and her client; and a young girl and her grandfather prepare and wait for the body of her father at the pā. This was the first screen drama directed by Don Selwyn, who argued "what Rawiri is saying in his script is that there are lots of things Māori which are left out of the education system." 

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Mark II

1986, As: Matthew - Television

A road movie with a heart of gold, Mark II is "the Polynesian Easy Rider". Three teens (Nicholas Rogers, Mitchell Manuel, Faifua Amiga) head south from Auckland in a two-tone Mark II Zephyr, two of them blissfully unaware they're being pursued by a van-load of vengeful thugs. Along the way, they encounter the Mongrel Mob, who turn out to be quite helpful, and experience love, prejudice and jealousy from strangers. Written by Mike Walker and Manuel, it was TVNZ's first telefeature and is the third film in a loose trilogy (following Kingi's Story and Kingpin).

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Kingpin

1985, As: Willie Hoto - Film

Kingpin was the second of a trilogy of films from Mike Walker about troubled New Zealand youth (the others were Kingi's Story and TV movie Mark II) Filmed at, and inspired by residents of Kohitere Boys Training Centre in Levin, the bros-in-borstal tale follows a group of teens who are wards of the state. Kingpin focuses on the bond between Riki (Mitchell Manuel) and Willie (Fafua 'Junior' Amiga), who along with the other kids are terrorised by Karl (Nicholas Rogers), the Kingpin of the title. It was directed by Walker, who co-wrote the script with Manuel.