A passion for music helped Jane Yee get her first presenting job. After majoring in radio for her communications degree, she joined TV2's late night music slot M2 in 2001, and began a three year stint hosting music show Squeeze. In 2005 Yee joined channel C4 full-time as a presenter, where she directed a series of Homegrown Profiles of Kiwi musicians. She went on to spend time as Promotions Manager for the Kiwi arm of Universal Music. The longtime blogger concentrates these days on parenting, which she writes about on her self-titled website. She also hosts a podcast about television, for website The Spinoff.  

I love music for the same reasons as everyone else; it evokes a rainbow of emotions like nothing else and can speak to us and for us. It has also paid my rent for the last ten years. That helps! Jane Yee on website Love Music

Camp Rock the Tasman

2009, Presenter

Homegrown Profiles

2005, Director, Presenter, Interviewer - Television

Homegrown Profiles was a spin-off from music channel C4's local music series Homegrown. Screened in 2005, the interview-based show featured episodes devoted to the Finn Brothers, Dave Dobbyn, Bic Runga, Anika Moa, Shihad and Che Fu. The hour-long programmes were based around an extended interview with each artist, intercut with music videos and other performance material— all held together with a well-scripted narration by researcher/ interviewer/ director Jane Yee. Yee writes about making the show here.   

Homegrown Profiles: Anika Moa

2005, Director, Interviewer - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles features singer/songwriter Anika Moa, who was signed to international label Atlantic Records and recording her debut album Thinking Room in New York when she was barely out of her teens. Moa talks about growing up in a musical household in Christchurch; being discovered through the annual Rockquest competition; her American experience and the decision that it wasn't a good fit for her; and her return to New Zealand and the happier experience of making her second album Stolen Hill. 

Homegrown Profiles: Bic Runga

2005, Director, Interviewer - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles features singer/songwriter Bic Runga, who burst onto the New Zealand music scene in 1997 with her record-breaking debut album Drive. Since then Runga has had both local and international success and released two further hit albums, Beautiful Collision and Birds. Runga talks about growing up in a musical household (her mother and two older sisters are all singers), the success of Drive, and her "difficult second album", which was released a full five years after her debut. 

Homegrown Profiles: Che Fu

2005, Interviewer, Director - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles features hip-hop star Che Fu, who began his music career with high school band The Lowdown Dirty Blues Band, which later evolved into 90s chart-toppers Supergroove. Che Fu talks about his messy split from Supergroove, and how the huge success of the single 'Chains' (with DLT) wasn't enjoyable because he was still upset by what had happened with the band. He also talks about the making of his three solo albums. Since this documentary was made in 2005, Che Fu and Supergroove have reconciled for reunion gigs.

Homegrown Profiles: Dave Dobbyn

2005, Director, Interviewer - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles looks at the 30 year career of singer/songwriter Dave Dobbyn, whose songs are mainstays of the Aotearoa soundscape. Dobbyn talks about nerve-wracking early days with th' Dudes, where the name for band DD Smash originated, and his long solo career. In a wide-ranging and thoughtful interview, Dobbyn discusses the highs and lows of a life in music, including the mayhem and causes of the 1984 Aotea Square riot, being told his best album was unreleasable, and the satisfaction of writing the Footrot Flats soundtrack.

Homegrown Profiles: Shihad

2005, Director, Interviewer - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles looks at the long career of New Zealand heavy rock's favourite sons Shihad. Singer Jon Toogood talks frankly about the band's highs and lows, from forming at Wellington High School to the release of Love is the New Hate in 2005 (when this was made). In a sometimes brutally honest self-appraisal, Toogood talks about the band's success in Australia being tempered with too much drug-taking and ego, their ill-fated name change, and the great American dream that didn't quite work out as planned. 

Homegrown Profiles: The Finns

2005, Interviewer, Director - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles looks at the long and distinguished musical careers of Kiwi music icons Tim and Neil Finn. The programme covers the early days of Split Enz, Neil joining the band at the age of 18, and Tim leaving in 1984; plus Neil forming Crowded House, Tim's short stint in his brother's band, the Finn's solo careers, and their two albums recording as the Finn Brothers. Jane Yee's interview with the brothers is revealing and fascinating, and includes great early Split Enz footage.

Special Features

2005 - 2007, Presenter - Television

Squeeze - Splore

2004, Presenter, Research - Television

The Splore summer music festival has always been as much about alternative lifestyles as live music: in other words, it's a poi twirling, hippie paradise. Presenter Jane Yee teams up with Evan Short — one half of electronica act Concord Dawn — to wander around the idyllic Waharau Regional Park setting, take a wedding snap at the 'Las Vegas Wedding Chapel', and witness the air-cracking skills of The Wild Whip Man. Yee also chats to Fat Freddy's Drop and Nathan Haines, and showcases videos for 'Don't Tell Me' (Concord Dawn), 'Hope' (Fat Freddy's), and 'Doot Dude' (Haines). 

We Gon Ride

2003, As: Herself - Music video

Director Chris Graham delivers five minutes of cars, comedy and eye candy in this slick who's who of the 2003 Kiwi scene. Featuring DJ Sir-Vere, VJ Jane Yee, ex sports star Matthew Ridge and Paul Holmes (well actually he was a no show — but his understudy made an appearance), the clip succeeded in planting a relatively unknown hip hop artist squarely on the front page. The result was the biggest selling Kiwi single of the year (it went platinum, and spent five weeks at number one). Named Best Video at the 2005 NZ Music Awards, it cost at least $50,000 to make. 

Rumba

2002, Presenter - Television

M2

2001 - 2003, Presenter

Space

2002, Presenter - Television

Late night music show Space launched on TV2 in 2000, with a pair of hosts introducing live performances, interviews, music videos and occasional silliness. The show marked the first ongoing screen gig for Jaquie Brown, who appeared with future X Factor New Zealand host Dominic Bowden. When Bowden left in 2002, he was replaced by Hugh Sundae. The final season was helmed by Jo Tuapawa and ex Space researcher Phil Bostwick. Space was made by production company Satellite Media, whose credits include many shows involving music (Ground Zero, Rocked the Nation). 

Squeeze

2001 - 2004, Presenter - Television

Squeeze showcased New Zealand music. Alongside a steady diet of music videos, the show featured interviews with musicians, and reports on everything from new releases to music festivals to quotas. Launched on TV2 in a Sunday morning slot, the youth-orientated show was presented for its first four seasons by Francesca Rudkin. Around the time M2 presenter Jane Yee took over in 2001, the show began devoting the bulk of each episode to a single topic. Made by Satellite Pictures (now Satellite), Squeeze was also repeated in a mid-week evening slot.