Born in Derbyshire, England, Richard Moss arrived in Auckland as a teen, then jacked in a potential career fixing earthmoving equipment so he could study theatre and opera singing. Alongside seven years acting on the radio, he was prolific in children's theatre, which led to his first TV role, in 1971's Pinocchio Travelling Circus. Since then Moss has amassed over 40 screen credits, including criminal Sam Collins in the classic Hunter's Gold, an alcoholic doctor in an episode of Country GP, and Australia's Blue Heelers. After hosting early 80s local show Good Morning with Tina Grenville, he moved to Australia in the mid 80s.  

I was always very happy in New Zealand. I left to pursue work and a change of life when my marriage broke down. But I have always missed NZ for its superior theatre world, and its wonderfully innovative approach to the arts. Richard Moss

Joker Game

2015, As: Graham - Film

Bed of Roses

2008 - 2010, As: Bob Stinson - Television

The Mysterious Geographic Explorations of Jasper Morello

2005, As: Various voices - Short Film

Marshall Law

2002, As: Attila - Television

Crash Zone

1999 - 2001, As: Nigel Hartford - Television

State Coroner

1997, As: Gascoyne - Television

Janus

1995, As: Magistrate - Television

Blue Heelers

1994, 2000, As: various roles - Television

The Feds: Seduction

1993, As: Senator North - Television

The Power, the Passion

1989, As: Burton the chauffeur - Television

The Flying Doctors

1986 - 1991, As: Various roles - Television

Pallet on the Floor

1986, As: Poofter Peacock - Film

The last novel by Taranaki author Ronald Hugh Morrieson revolves around a freezing plant worker (Peter McCauley) in an inter-racial marriage. The role of an English remittance man was expanded in a failed attempt to cast Peter O'Toole (the role ultimately went to NZ-born Bruce Spence). Morrieson's view of small town NZ is a dark one, as he explores racism, violence, murder, suicide and blackmail. Bruno Lawrence contributes to Jonathan Crayford's  jazz-tinged score, and features in the wedding band. The freezing works scenes were shot at the defunct plant in Patea.

Neighbours

1987 - 1989, As: Various roles - Television

Hanlon

1985, As: Sergeant Tilly - Television

This was New Zealand's first big historical drama after the controversy over the cost of The Governor almost a decade earlier. Over seven episodes — set between 1895 and 1914 — it followed the life of Dunedin barrister Alf Hanlon, focussing on six of his most important cases. British actor David Gwillim played Hanlon, while Australian Robyn Nevin was cast as convicted baby murderer Minnie Dean in the first and most celebrated episode. A major critical, ratings and awards success, it immediately recouped its budget when the Minnie Dean episode spurred a big international sale.

Country GP

1984 - 1985, Actor - Television

Country GP was a major 80s drama series that charted the post-war years 1945 to 1950 in a rural central South Island town. Using fast-turnaround techniques that anticipated later series like Shortland Street, 66 episodes of Country GP were shot in 18 months at a specially built set in Whiteman’s Valley, Lower Hutt. It was groundbreaking as the first NZ series to cast a Samoan in a title role (Lani Tupu as Dr David Miller); but it also provided a nostalgic look back to an apparently kinder, gentler time than mid-80s New Zealand with its major social reforms and upheavals.

Trespasses

1984, As: Colin Dobbs - Film

Both Sides of the Fence

1984, As: Alex Boradinsky - Television

Good Morning (Northern Television show)

1982 - 1983, Presenter - Television

Sea Urchins

1980, As: Lieutenant Commander Dempsey - Television

This TVNZ kidult drama is a saltwater Swallows and Amazons, where the plucky "urchins" stumble upon villainous plots (from missing treasure to wildlife smuggling) on their seaside adventures. Over three series, locations like Mahurangi Peninsula in the Hauraki Gulf — where the youngsters holidayed with their uncle — and the Marlborough Sounds allowed for much floatplane, launch and navy frigate chase action. The cast included an array of experienced talent and featured a young Rebecca Gibney (the Packed to Rafter’s star’s first major TV role) and Robert Rakete.

Prisoner

1995, As: David Adams - Television

The Mackenzie Affair - Tancred (Final Episode)

1977, As: Warder Grimble - Television

The Mackenzie Affair told the story of colonial folk hero James Mackenzie: accused of rustling 1000 sheep in the high country that would later bear his name. This fifth and final episode sees the manhunt for Mackenzie over, with ‘Jock’ facing a sentence of hard labour and provoking sympathy from equivocal sheriff Henry Tancred. Adapted from James McNeish’s book, the early co-production (with Scottish TV) imported Caledonian lead actor James Cosmo (Braveheart, Game of Thrones) and veteran UK TV director Joan Craft. It was made by Hunter’s Gold producer John McRae.

Hunter's Gold

1976, As: Sam Collins - Television

This classic kids’ adventure tale follows a 13-year-old boy on a quest to find his father, missing amidst the 1860s Otago gold rush. When it launched in September 1976, the 13 part series was the most expensive local TV drama yet made. Under the reins of director Tom Parkinson, the series brandished unprecedented production values, and panned the Central Otago vistas for all their worth. Its huge local popularity was matched abroad (BBC screened it multiple times); it showed that NZ-made kids’ drama could be exported, and helped establish the new second television channel.

Winners & Losers

1976, Actor - Television

Launched on 5 April 1976, this television series heralded a new age in Kiwi screen drama. Indie talents Roger Donaldson and Ian Mune based their tales of success and failure on New Zealand short stories, after managing to negotiate funding from various government sources. Then the pair took the series to Europe, proving there was strong overseas demand for Kiwi stories. Winners & Losers became a perennial in local classrooms. In the backgrounders, Mune recalls the show's origins. There are also pieces on its place in local screen history, and its restoration in 2018.

On the Day

1975, Actor - Television

Close to Home

1981, Actor - Television

Pioneering soap opera Close To Home first screened in May 1975. For just over eight years, middle New Zealand found their mirror in the life and times of Wellington’s Hearte clan. At its peak in 1977, nearly one million viewers tuned in twice weekly to watch the series, which was co-created by Michael Noonan and Tony Isaac. They initially only agreed to make it on condition they got approval for The Governor. The popular family saga carved a regular niche for local drama on screen; the demands of creating a regular show helped develop the skills of Kiwi actors and crew.

Ryan

1974, As:Sam - Television

Quartet

1974, Actor - Television

479

1974, Actor - Television

Pinocchio Travelling Circus

1971, As: Mr Fireeater (the Circus Master) - Television