Andrew Whiteside made his name as a reporter, director and producer on Queer Nation, one of the world's longest running queer television programmes. After nine years with the show, Whiteside went on to set up his own company, Roll Tape Productions. 

There isn't a story topic he hasn't covered: from AIDS and HIV; arts and entertainment; politics and discrimination; health and recreation. TVNZ profile

Shortland Street - Past Memories

2017, Director, Camera - Web

In these short clips from our ScreenTalk interviews, Shortland Street actors talk about the show.   - Michael Galvin on doing a rap - Martin Henderson on fast-paced TV - Robyn Malcolm on "the slut in the cardy"  - Tem Morrison on medical terms - John Leigh on his exit - Danielle Cormack on leaving first - Antony Starr on acting under pressure - Angela Bloomfield on her first day - Craig Parker on forgetting ego - Shane Cortese on his dark role - Theresa Healey on playing "sassy"   - Ido Drent on memorising fast - Stephanie Tauevihi on ravaging Blair Strang - Dean O'Gorman on relaxing on TV - Amanda Billing on farewelling her character - Mark Ferguson on playing his own brother  - Stelios Yiakmis on stumbling into the set - Elizabeth McRae on being warned away - Rob Magasiva on nerves - Nancy Brunning on her first six months - Peter Elliott on thugs and idiots - Paul Gittins on advice - Blair Strang on sleeping with his sister - Geraldine Brophy on her role - Joel Tobeck on wheelchair jokes 

Gay Talk Tonight

2012 - ongoing, Presenter, Director, Camera, Editor - Television

50 Years of New Zealand Television: 2 - The Whole World's Watching

2010, Subject - Television

The birth of television in the 1960s meant that suddenly protests and civil unrest could be broadcast directly into Kiwi homes. This episode of 50 Years of New Zealand Television looks at many of those events — involving everything from the Vietnam War and the Springbok tour, to Bastion Point and the Homosexual Law Reform Act. It also examines how being televised altered their impact. Interviews with both protestors and reporters provide a unique insight into what it was like to be living through extraordinary periods of New Zealand history.

At a Distance

2009, Director - Short Film

Beginnings

2007, Director - Short Film

Queer Nation - Marilyn Waring

2004, Producer, Writer, Director, Presenter - Television

The episode opens with a story about the Maxim Institute, an international think tank that has been linked to anti-gay fundamentalist groups. The main feature focuses on Marilyn Waring, an MP from 1975 until 84. She talks candidly about the personal cost of being in parliament — especially when she was outed as a lesbian. Waring also shares her opinions about the Civil Unions Bill and why she is opposed to it. The show finishes with a gay literature review and an interview with James Hadley, the incoming programme manager of Wellington's Bats Theatre. 

Queer Nation - State of the Queer Nation

2004, Writer, Director, Producer - Television

A special episode which asks ten queer people from all over New Zealand about issues affecting their lives. Subjects include health, looking at HIV and safe sex; issues around homophobia, especially focusing on opposition to the Civil Union Bill (passed after this programme was made); the importance of family and relationships; bringing up children within gay relationships; and attitudes to gay marriage (or civil unions). It winds up with comments on how much more tolerant New Zealand society has become since homosexual law reform, in 1986. 

Queer Nation - Takatāpui

2004, Producer, Director, Writer - Television

In this Queer Nation edition 'QNN' (queer news headlines) leads, with stories about moves to introduce gay marriage in Australia and Canada, and a dramatic rise in the number of HIV cases in New Zealand. Crew involved in Takatāpui, on Māori Television, promote their (new at the time) programme. The third part of this episode focuses on the first reading of the Civil Union Bill, on 24 June 2004. With still some confusion surrounding the bill, its workings are explained to viewers.

Queer Nation - Farm Boys

2003, Producer, Writer, Director - Television

Part One looks at lesbian relationships - how different are they? A light-hearted romp through subjects such as butch and femme, monogamy, lesbian bed death, and raising children. Two gay farmers feature next, and talk about farming in the Waikato, and their jobs as horse trainer and shearer. Part Three takes us inside Mt Eden Prison where we meet a lesbian prison officer. She talks about working in this tough, testosterone-filled environment and reveals how observing men living in these conditions has made her a more compassionate person. 

Queer Nation - Gay Games Reloaded

2003, Producer - Television

This Queer Nation episode focuses on the Gay Games, held in Sydney in 2002. With more than 12,000 participants (including 441 New Zealanders) the event was Australasia's largest queer event ever. It begins with an overview of the event, looking at the benefits it had for the community, business, and tourism. The second part is less upbeat, addressing the massive $2m loss the Games incurred, with discussion around the reasons for this. Part three is about the next Gay Games, to be held in Montreal in 2006, along with a brief historical overview of the event. 

Queer Nation - Peter Ellis: A Queer Perspective

2003, Producer - Television

This is the second part of a Queer Nation special about Peter Ellis, who was accused of molesting children in a Christchurch crèche in 1992. It examines how Ellis's sexuality permeated the case and its coverage, and influenced public opinion. It also focuses on the gay community's lack of support, and proposes reasons. Interviewees include Lynley Hood, whose book A City Possessed argued the case had the hallmarks of a witch hunt, Gay NZ editor Jay Bennie, and lesbian psychologist Miriam Saphira, who helped set up the guidelines under which the children were interviewed.

Queer Nation - Peter Ellis: A Question of Justice

2003, Producer - Television

The first part of this disturbing double documentary focuses on the man accused of molesting seven children in a Christchurch crèche in 1992. The programme is divided into seven chapters, in which Ellis talks about his accusation and arrest, the trial, his prison sentence, his two appeals and his eventual release in 2000. Ellis initially thought the accusation was so ridiculous that it would soon get sorted out. Instead, he was found guilty on 16 charges and convicted to 10 years imprisonment, despite the lack of any conclusive evidence.

Queer Nation - Wellington Queer People, Queer Places, Queer Stories

2002, Producer - Television

This Queer Nation episode, presented by Max Currie, is an overview of the capital city's queer history. The literary demimonde is first up: Katherine Mansfield's lesbian affairs and a scandal involving Norris Davey (aka Frank Sargeson). Then the role is explored of the Dorian Society (1962-1986) and its subgroup the Homosexual Law Reform Society, which paved the way towards decriminalisation in the 1980s. The programme also introduces viewers to NZ’s most famous trannies: Carmen and then-MP Georgina Beyer. Interviews and archive material spice up the history.

Queer Nation

1996 - 2004, Presenter, Director, Producer - Television

Queer Nation was a factual series made by, for and about lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender (LGBT) New Zealanders. Produced by Livingstone Productions with John A Givins at the helm, it screened on TVNZ for 11 seasons over nine years from 1996 till 2004 and was the world's longest running free-to-air TV programme made for the LGBT community. Long-serving presenters included original host (and future NZ On Screen ScreenTalk director) Andrew Whiteside, Libby Magee and Nettie Kinmott. Queer Nation won Best Factual Series at the NZ Television Awards 2003.