In 2007 Lucy Wigmore did something unusual — take over an already established role on Shortland Street. In spite of the show’s famously protective fanbase, Wigmore's portrayal of Dr Justine Jones soon became a fan favourite. Since her departure, the Toi Whaakari grad has played policewoman Lillian Armfield in Aussie drama Underbelly: Razor and taken on directing, with short films Sign Language and Stationery.

On Shortland Street you never quite know in what direction your character will be heading next, and what I like about film and theatre is that you play someone who's in a fixed story, with a beginning and an end. Lucy Wigmore in the NZ Woman's Weekly, 9 June 2008

The Bad Seed

2019, As: Paula - Television

Stationery

2015, Director, Writer, Producer, As: Celine van Gelder - Short Film

Interloafer

2015, As: Harper Harrison, Writer - Short Film

Love Child

2014, As: Carol - Television

Tricky Business

2012, As: Harriet Lansing - Television

Underbelly: Razor

2011, As: Lillian Armfield - Television

Sign Language

2010, Writer, Executive Producer, Director - Short Film

Rapunzel

2009, First Assistant Director - Short Film

The Warning

2009, As: Alex Puddle - Short Film

Shortland Street - The Ferndale Strangler finale

2008, As: Doctor Justine Jones - Television

Trapped in a storage locker, shorn of her appendix, nurse Alice Piper (Toni Potter) turns the tables on her captor: psycho Joey Henderson (Johnny Barker). When Doctor Craig Valentine encounters Henderson, he finds himself caught between anger and duty. Finally marking the end of the Ferndale Strangler's reign, this March 2008 Shortland Street episode climaxed an eight-month long plotline which saw five members of the cast falling victim. Earlier three leaked videos each revealed a different killer (none of them Joey), upping the suspense as to the strangler's real identity.

The Last Magic Show

2007, As: Margot - Film

Orange Roughies

2007, As: Marlene - Television

Orange Roughies was a 'border security' drama series following a Police and Customs task force led by Danny Wilder (Australian actor Nicholas Coughan). Made for TV One, the ScreenWorks production was likely inspired by Australian television hit Water Rats. Set in and around Auckland Harbour, it featured storylines involving drug busts, child trafficking, undercover ops and plenty of land-sea chase action. The show was created by Rod Johns and former policeman Scott McJorrow. The script team was rounded out by Kristen Warner and series writer Greg McGee.

Eating Media Lunch

2003, As: Josephine Smythe - Television

Eating Media Lunch satirised mainstream media, from "issues of the day" journalism to reality television, to the society pages (lampooned in the "celebrity share market index index"). No fish was too big or barrel too small. Some of it was even true. Presenter Jeremy Wells kept a straight face over seven seasons, while investigating issues inexplicably missed by other media (e.g. the porno film made in Taranaki and shot in te reo, or ritalin-fueled reality programme Medswap). EML's seventh season won Best Comedy Programme at the 2008 Qantas Film and TV Awards.  

For Good

2003, As: Reporter - Film

New Zealand's so-called 'cinema of unease' is stretched in new directions in this psychological drama, inspired by real-life interviews with criminals and victim's families. Writer/director Stuart McKenzie's feature debut follows Lisa (Michelle Langstone), a young woman haunted by the rape and murder of a former teenage acquaintance. Lisa's fascination leads her to the victim's parents - and to prison, to interview the charismatic killer (Tim Balme). The result is an intelligent examination of the after effects of violent crime. Shayne Carter provides the soundtrack.

Spring Flames

2003, As: Gwen - Short Film

The Ballantyne's Department Store fire in November 1947 claimed 41 lives and left a lasting scar on Christchurch — the city’s biggest single disaster until the 2011 earthquake. The events of that spring day are explored in this short film which intersperses archive footage with a fictional account of workers and customers in the tailoring department as the dramas of everyday life are suddenly overwhelmed. It was directed by Aileen O’Sullivan, shot by Alun Bollinger and made with the NZ Drama School graduating class of 2002 (with music by Gareth Farr).

Shortland Street

2007 - 2009, As: Justine Jones - Television

Shortland Street is a fast-paced serial drama set in an inner city Auckland hospital. The long-running South Pacific Pictures production is based around the births, deaths and marriages of the hospital's staff and patients. It screens on TVNZ’s TV2 network five days a week. In 2017 the show was set to celebrate its 25th anniversary, making it New Zealand’s longest running drama by far. Characters and lines from the show have entered the culture — starting with “you’re not in Guatemala now, Dr Ropata!” in the very first episode. Mihi Murray writes about Shortland Street here.