Bill McCarthy

Presenter, Executive

Bill McCarthy’s wide-ranging television career spans 50 years and counting. McCarthy won a keen following when he anchored coverage of the 1974 Commonwealth Games. After five years presenting Television One’s network news (alternating with Dougal Stevenson), he became a producer and director, and did time as TVNZ’s head of sports. McCarthy set up his own company in 1990, and continues to make shows for cable television.

Karen Sims

Journalist

A newspaper journalist by training, Karen Sims began her TV career on South Pacific Television’s News at Ten. In the early 80s she moved into presenting, with current affairs shows Eyewitness and Foreign Correspondent. She co-presented the nightly Eyewitness News alongside David Beatson, but continued to work as a journalist — and expected to be judged on her field stories and studio interviews, rather than as a celebrity.

Mike McRoberts

Newsreader, Reporter [Ngāti Kahungunu]

TV3 news anchor Mike McRoberts spent a decade as a radio reporter, then made his name as a sports journalist with TVNZ in the mid 90s. After six years with the state broadcaster, including occasional shifts reading the primetime news, he moved to TV3. From 2005, he joined Hilary Barry leading the 6pm news bulletin. Since then he has presented reports and bulletins from Christchurch, Iraq, Haiti and the Philippines.

Hilary Barry

Journalist, Newsreader

Hilary Barry has long experience of reporting and reading the news. In 1993 she began a two decade stint at TV3. In 2005 she became  anchor of the channel's primetime news, alongside Mike McRobert. Barry went on to report from the Canterbury quakes, the 2011 royal wedding and the famine in Africa. She left TV3 in 2016, and began co-hosting TVNZ's Breakfast; in 2018 she moved to primetime show Seven Sharp

Peter Williams

Presenter, Commentator

Veteran presenter Peter Williams has been working continuously in broadcasting ever since starting in radio as a teen. In 1979 he joined TV One as a sports show host and commentator, and went on to present from the Olympics and the Rugby World Cup. In the mid 90s the longtime cricket fan began a move into news; these days he reads the news on Breakfast and for primetime weekend bulletins on TV One. 

Carolyn Robinson

Newsreader, Presenter

Carolyn Robinson has presented TV news for roughly two decades. For seven years she hosted Nightline, and was a weekend anchor for 3 News (alongside Simon Shepherd). She also filled in as a weekday back-up to Hilary Barry, and fronted foreign affairs with Mike McRoberts. Robinson also hosted consumer investigation show What’s Really In Our Food. In 2016 she took over presenting 20/20 for TV One.

Lindsay Shelton

Film salesman

After time in print and television news, and nine years commanding the Wellington Film Festival, Shelton began his dream job — selling local films for the New Zealand Film Commission. During a 22 year run as the commission's first marketing director he handled sales for more than 60 feature films, including Goodbye Pork Pie, An Angel at My Table and Once Were Warriors.

Colin McRae

Producer, Director

In a career spanning four decades, director/producer Colin McRae has worked in news and current affairs, made documentaries and spent time as TV3’s Head of Sport. He conceived and produced award-winning series The New Zealand Wars. An association with Māori Television has seen him produce Native Affairs for six years, and play a leading role in its Anzac Day and election coverage.

Alison Mau

Presenter, Reporter

From Newsnight to Fair Go, Alison Mau's appearances on Kiwi screens cover over 20 years. Australian-born, she began her television career in the UK, and flourished in Aotearoa. Mau has appeared on many news and current affairs slots, and presented on both Breakfast and primetime show Seven Sharp. In March 2018 she announced the launch of the #MeTooNZ campaign, investigating workplace harassment. 

Conon Fraser

Producer, Director

As writer and presenter of The World Around Us, and producer of Looking at New Zealand, Conon Fraser was an early television celebrity. He joined the National Film Unit in 1969 and continued to make films documenting his adopted country’s landscape and history, and New Zealanders’ way of life. Fraser died on 17 June 2014, aged 84.