Interview

Jaquie Brown - Funny As Interview

Jaquie Brown began her media career in radio, before branching out into television as host of music show Space and star of comedy series The Jaquie Brown Diaries.

Interview

Max Cryer - Funny As Interview

Purveyor of good grammar and master of words, Max Cryer has had an extensive career in the New Zealand entertainment industry.

Interview

Ben Hurley - Funny As Interview

Stand-up comedian Ben Hurley began in the hotbed of Wellington comedy.

Interview

Peter Downes - Funny As Interview

Broadcaster and sound historian Peter Downes began his radio career in 1947, producing entertainment programmes at Wellington station 2YA.

Interview

David McPhail - Funny As Interview

A Week of It co-creator David McPhail is a verifiable Kiwi comedy legend.

Interview

Alice Snedden - Funny As Interview

A lawyer by trade, Alice Snedden discovered that her passion was performing comedy while living in the United States.

Interview

Urzila Carlson - Funny As Interview

South African-born Urzila Carlson got her break in Kiwi comedy in 2008, after a workmate entered her in a stand-up competition.

Interview

Oscar Kightley - Funny As Interview

A love of English and writing saw the multi-talented Oscar Kightley pursue journalism on his journey to artistic success. He talks about that journey in this extended Funny As interview, including: John Clarke being the first New Zealander that cracked him up The value of touring schools with theatre group Pacific Underground, and the tough audience that is youth The longevity of The Naked Samoans, from their first show in 1998, to a show 20 years later The birth of bro’Town, its success, and plans for a bro'Town movie The "I'd love to see my face up there, like, really big" moment that was movie Sione’s Wedding Making comedy in the new media landscape

Interview

Debbie Dorday - Funny As Interview

Debbie Dorday is best known for her cabaret shows, where she performed as both a dancer and a comedian.

Interview

Andrew Clay - Funny As Interview

Andrew Clay forged his stand-up comedy career in Australia, before returning battle-hardened to New Zealand. The brutality of that environment is among the things he discusses in this Funny As interview. Clay also talks about: Being the dude at the back of the class, trying to make people laugh The lightbulb moment when Australian comedian George Smilovici told him he should be a stand-up comedian Feeling pride when his conservative dad said “you’d be good at that” The “walking off to the sound of your own footsteps” moments of stand-up comedy, and the immediacy of knowing "straight away whether you're doing well” Writing two stage plays, “to try to be funny in a different way”