Series

It is I Count Homogenized

Television, 1983

The immortal Count Homogenized, a vampire with a white afro and cape and a lust for milk, lodged himself in the hearts of a generation of Kiwi kids. After first portraying the vampire in A Haunting We Will Go, actor Russell Smith took centre stage in 1983's It is I Count Homogenized. This follow-up series transfers proceedings from the haunted house trappings of the original to a suburban dairy, where Homogenized continues his mission to get his teeth into what matters: the milk. Trivia: the series was made in association with the NZ Milk Promotion Council.

Series

A Haunting We Will Go

Television, 1979–1980

Count Homogenized, the vanilla-clad vampire with a lust for milk made his debut on this ghost-flavoured children's series, before moving on to star in his own show. Russell Smith's portrayal of the mischievous The Count has lodged itself in the hearts of many Kiwi kids of a certain vintage and has become an — absolute original — icon of NZ TV. True Blood has nothing on The Count and his unending search for bovine liquid sustenance!

Series

Tales of the Mist

Television, 1986

Tales of the Mist was an 80s series for children that dramatised six stories by writer Anthony Holcroft. Peppered with folklore, magic and animism (the belief that things in the natural world posses a ‘spirit’) the six stories feature encounters with otherworldly beings in rustic New Zealand settings: The Island in the Lagoon, The Tramp, Girl in the Cabbage Tree, The Night Bees, and Rosie Moonshine. The show was directed by NZ kids television veteran (Woolly Valley, Count Homogenized) Kim Gabara.

Series

Woolly Valley

Television, 1982

The magpie quardle oodled and the narrator uttered, "Welcome to Woolly Valley", in the intro to this children's TV classic. The low-tech puppet show with its rustic charm was familiar to a generation of kids who grew up in the 80s. It follows the lives of woolly-haired farmer Wally and his long-suffering wife Beattie, who live with talking ewe Eunice. Also featured is hippie Tussock, voiced by Russell (Count Homogenized) Smith. Woolly Valley marked an early piece of screenwriting by children's writer Margaret Mahy.