Mike King Tonight - Final Episode

Television, 2003 (Full Length Episode)

Popular comedian Mike King tried his hand at a Letterman-style talk show with this relatively short-lived TV2 series. In this final episode King’s guests are TV personality Jason Gunn, McLeod's Daughters actor Lisa Chappell, kickboxer Ray Sefo, and Australian comedy writer Santo Cilauro, who talks about working with the late Bruno Lawrence on TV series Frontline. One-time Commodores bassist Ronald LaPread leads the eight-piece house band.

in beTWEEN - Politics

Television, 2010 (Full Length Episode)

Several years before they became leaders of the Labour and National parties, Jacinda Ardern and Simon Bridges got down with youth in this political episode of in beTWEEN. Casually dressed and fresh-faced, Bridges and Ardern discuss why they got into politics with presenters Jeremy Hollis and Julia Bloore (née Wright). Ardern jokes about kicking "Simon in the shins" during discussions. Actor Rawiri Paratene also appears; he says watching elders talk about issues on the marae inspired him to become political early on — at 16, he was in Māori activist group Ngā Tamatoa.

Antiques for Love or Money - Episode Three

Television, 1986 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of the antiques appraisal series was recorded at Auckland Museum with host Dougal Stevenson, Marshall Seifert and Trevor Plumbly joined by Cherry Raymond, and Richard Valentine. Items examined include daguerreotypes, cubist pottery cats by Louis Wain, Edwardian Lavalier pendants and a Marconi radio. It also features a discussion about different types of valuation ... then there’s the piece of pottery, from Auckland artist Cameron Brown’s Titian studio (inspired by the 1956 Springbok Tour), which has the panel very much divided about its merits.

Ans Westra - Private Journeys / Public Signposts

Television, 2006 (Full Length)

Private Journeys / Public Signposts turns the camera on photographer Ans Westra. Dutch emigree Westra has captured iconic images of New Zealanders since the late 1950s, expressively observing Aotearoa societal changes, particularly Māori urban drift. This film explores her remarkable life and work, and includes commentary from family and friends, fellow photographers, and colleagues, as well as discussion of the Washday at the Pa controversy. Luit Bieringa, curator of Westra's retrospective photo exhibition, directed the film, his first. 

Queer Nation - Gay Games Reloaded

Television, 2003 (Full Length)

This Queer Nation episode focuses on the Gay Games, held in Sydney in 2002. With more than 12,000 participants (including 441 New Zealanders) the event was Australasia's largest queer event ever. It begins with an overview of the event, looking at the benefits it had for the community, business, and tourism. The second part is less upbeat, addressing the massive $2m loss the Games incurred, with discussion around the reasons for this. Part three is about the next Gay Games, to be held in Montreal in 2006, along with a brief historical overview of the event. 

It's in the Genes Girls

Television, 1993 (Full Length)

In this documentary for TV One, director Aileen O'Sullivan turns the camera on three sets of mother/daughter artists, and asks whether art is in the genes. Interviewing each other about their creative lives are actor Kate Harcourt and actor/acting teacher Miranda Harcourt; weaver Erenora Puketapu-Hetet and weaver/painter Veranoa Hetet (née Hauwaho); and painter Jacqueline Fahey and performer/sculptor Augusta McDonald. Frank yet loving discussions abound, like when Hetet tells her mother "sometimes you come up with silly things".

How's Life? (Episode)

Television, 2002 (Full Length Episode)

Hosted by Charlotte Dawson, How’s Life? saw a rotating panel of guests responding to letters from viewers in an effort to help them navigate their day to day struggles. In this episode, the panel is made up of Paul Henry, Suzanne Paul, a pre-Outrageous Fortune Robyn Malcolm and ex Department of Work and Income boss Christine Rankin. The issues under discussion include a difficult five-year-old, strangers sneezing on your food, and a teenager who doesn't approve of their ex's new boyfriend. There is also meningococcal awareness advice from Auckland District Health Board.

Kete Aronui - Taane Mete & Taiaroa Royal

Television, 2007 (Excerpts)

This episode from series five of Kete Aronui, a documentary series featuring Aotearoa's artists that screened on Māori Television, follows the careers of iconic contemporary dancers Taane Mete and Taiaroa Royal. For both, training at Te Whaea propelled them into their art, teaching them not only technique but also a way of life. Featuring footage of Royal dancing in Douglas Wright's Forever (1993), the excerpt also includes a dance class with Michael Parmenter, another dance great, and discussion of dance companies Limbs and Black Grace.

Frost Over New Zealand - The Fat Society

Television, 1973 (Full Length Episode)

Years before it became a national health crisis, star UK broadcaster David Frost hosted this audience discussion on NZ’s “battle of the bulge”. And far from his later interrogation of Nixon, Frost’s form here is loose and relaxed. Analysis makes way for his wry examinations of such du jour weight-loss products as portable saunas, laxative pills, “Easy-Slim” underwear, and the Slendermatic: a muscle vibration unit modelled by a bikini-clad lass reclining on a sheepskin rug. This was one of six Frost Over New Zealand specials filmed over a whirlwind four-day shoot.

Backch@t - First Episode

Television, 1998 (Excerpts)

Backch@t was an award-winning magazine-style arts and culture show that appealed, right from the opening acid-jazz theme tune, to a literate late-90s arts audience. Fronted by media personality Bill Ralston, these excerpts from the first episode come out guns blazing with a debate by panellists about Tania Kovats's controversial artwork 'Virgin in a Condom', the sculpture that caused national upset when it was exhibited at Te Papa in 1998. Managing to keep a panel discussion convivial rather than confrontational, Ralston handles the catholic debate with aplomb.