Robin Laing

Producer

Robin Laing began her long career as a producer with 1985's Mr Wrong, the first of many projects she has worked on with director Gaylene Preston. In 1993 Laing was awarded a Member of the British Empire (MBE) for services to the New Zealand film industry. 

Gaylene Preston

Director

Gaylene Preston has been making feature films and documentaries with a distinctive New Zealand flavour and a strong social message for over 30 years. In 2001 she was the first filmmaker to be made a Laureate by the Arts Foundation, recognising her contribution to New Zealand film and television.

Graeme Tetley

Writer

Graeme Tetley began his long scriptwriting career with Vigil, one of the most acclaimed New Zealand films of the 1980s. He went on to co-create police show Shark in the Park, collaborate extensively with director Gaylene Preston (Ruby and Rata, Bread and Roses), and co-write Out of the Blue, the story of the Aramoana massacre. Tetley passed away on 13 March 2011.

Mike Hopkins

Sound

Sound designer Mike Hopkins worked on more than 20 feature films. Along the way he won wide respect for his craft and the humble dedication he applied to it. He won awards for his work on Kiwi classics Illustrious EnergyCrush and Heavenly Creatures, and Oscars for his sound editing on King Kong and the second Lord of the Rings movie. Hopkins died in a rafting accident on 30 December 2012.

Dave Letch

Actor

Perhaps best known in New Zealand as the psycho who stares from the poster of 1984's Death Warmed Up, Dave Letch has played ghosts (Mr Wrong) and suitors to writer Janet Frame (An Angel at My Table). In the 90s he left acting to co-found Australian theatre company Renegade, and has since done turns as theatre director, acting teacher, and film assessor. In 2006 Letch directed community-driven feature Wishbone.

Danny Mulheron

Actor, Director

Danny Mulheron has come at comedy from almost every angle: as a writer, as a director, as co-creator of the politically-incorrect Seven Periods with Mr Gormsby, and from inside a hippo suit. But laughter is not the whole story. Mulheron has also acted in Close to Home and Roche, presented for car programme AA Torque Show, and directed everything from documentaries (The Third Richard) to Rage, a tele-movie on the 1981 tour.

Geoff Murphy

Director, Writer

Geoff Murphy was a leading figure in the new wave of Kiwi filmmakers that emerged in the 1970s. His movie Goodbye Pork Pie became the first blockbuster of the local film renaissance. He completed an unsurpassed triple punch with Utu and sci-fi classic The Quiet Earth. Noted for his skill at action, knockabout comedy, and melding genres, Murphy spent a decade in Hollywood before returning home.

Thomas Burstyn

Cinematographer, Director

Canadian-born cinematographer Thomas Burstyn made his feature debut supplying the film noirish imagery for 80s Kiwi chillers The Lost Tribe, and Mr Wrong. Since then Burstyn has stacked up Canadian award nominations, and an Emmy nom for The 4400. Working with Kiwi partner Barbara Sumner-Burstyn, he has expanded into directing docos alongside other photographic assignments, winning two Qantas awards for the Berlin-selected This Way of Life

Heather Bolton

Actor

Heather Bolton impressed critics with one of her earliest screen performances: as the heroine battling a haunted car in Gaylene Preston's 1985 debut feature Mr Wrong. Bolton won a GOFTA award for her pains, then scored more awards for smaller roles in romance Arriving Tuesday and goldmining classic Illustrious Energy. After starring as the legendary radio host in touring stage show Aunt Daisy! The Musical (1991), she relocated to Australia. Since then Bolton has taken on more screen roles — including co-starring in a 2007 movie adaptation of Hamlet — while creating and acting in plays for Melbourne's Ranters Theatre.    

Michael Haigh

Actor

Michael Haigh gave up teaching to become a professional actor. A founding member of Wellington’s Circa Theatre, his TV legacy is the gruff office worker Jim in Roger Hall’s Gliding On — one of NZ television’s great comic characters and a role that won him a Feltex Award. He played Jim for five years and appeared in a number of other TV series and films (almost inevitably playing a policeman). Michael Haigh died in 1993.