Land of My Ancestors - Darcy Nicholas Artist

Television, 2007 (Excerpts)

This documentary looks at Māori painter/sculptor Darcy Nicholas. Nicholas grew up in the Taranaki, among extended whanau. “We didn’t have much money, but we had a lot of aroha and a lot of land to play in”. Director Lala Rolls looks at Nicholas’s relationship to his Māoritanga, and at how he took on the mantle of helping organise Toi Māori: The Eternal Flame — the first touring exhibition of Māori weaving. He and other participants recall travelling to America, and weaving “a map of friendship” with native American tangata whenua.

Collection

Best of the 70s

Curated by NZ On Screen team

The decade of fondue and flares also cooked up colour television. Our black and white living room icons — from Selwyn Toogood to Space Waltz — melted into a Kiwi kaleidoscope of Top Town, Grunt Machine, and Close to Home. And 'our stories' and rights fights — boks, hikoi, nukes and 'nam — echoed onscreen (Sleeping Dogs, Tangata Whenua). Ready to roll?

My Wedding and Other Secrets

Film, 2011 (Trailer, Excerpts, and Extras)

Emily Chu (award-winner Michelle Ang) is a young ‘banana’ (yellow on the outside, white on the inside) hoping to conceal a cross-cultural romance from her prudish Chinese parents in this romantic dramedy. Director Roseanne Liang’s feature debut draws on her autobiographical ‘video diary’ Banana in a Nutshell, which screened at the 2005 NZ International Film Festival. In the audience was producer John Barnett, who immediately offered to fund an adaptation. On its March 2010 release My Wedding gained several five star reviews, and strong box office.

Māori Boy

JGeek and The Geeks, Music Video, 2012

In a Mika-inspired cross cultural collision, this Māori music and comedy group blends traditional Māoritanga with the metrosexual world of fashion and beauty. Founded by former C4 presenter Jermaine Leef in 2010, they launched with this video which debuted on YouTube and received 100,000 views in 10 days. From Queen Street to the beach and bush, their appearance moves from Outkast-inspired nerd chic to a style best described as high camp haka; and boy band posturing mixes with lyrics tackling what it means to be a modern 'Māori boy' (“I play my Nintendo everyday”).

Series

Savage Play

Television, 1995

This three part mini-series is loosely based on the remarkable tour by the NZ Natives rugby team which played 107 games in Australasia and Great Britain in 1888-89. At its heart is a cross-cultural love story between Pony — the grandson of a chief and one of the side’s stars — and Charlotte: the granddaughter of an English Earl (Ian Richardson of House of Cards fame). The tour provided the first exposure to Māori for many in the UK. The interaction could be uncomfortable but even more so when affairs of the heart threatened the cultural divide.

Sons for the Road

Television, 2004 (Excerpts)

Auckland's Massive Company began in 1998 as a youth theatre group, committed to developing multicultural talent. Sons for the Road records a big moment in their evolution: performing at London's Royal Court Theatre, whose long history includes launching another piece of cross-cultural fertilisation, The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Their play is The Sons of Charlie Paora, a tale of rugby players and troubled male identity developed by Massive and UK writer Lennie James (who would later join the cast of hit The Walking Dead). The Independent called the play "wonderfully engaging".

The Fridge

Kevin Blackatini and the Frigids, Music Video, 1981

Prank phone calls were more radio DJ Kevin Black’s on-air stock in trade, but he fronted an unlikely Top 20 hit with this spoof of Deane Waretini’s 1981 chart topper ‘The Bridge’. With more than a little help from his Radio Hauraki creative team, a plea for cross cultural harmony was transformed into a novelty song celebration of a largely unsung domestic appliance. Blackie was front and centre with the souped up fridge in the video shot by TVNZ in Wellington, but producer Kim Adamson was the singer and co-writer (in addition to playing the dodgy salesman).

Artist

Bic Runga

The choruses on Bic Runga singles like 'Sway' and 'Good Morning Baby' are part of the New Zealand songbook. Runga is Christchurch-born, to a Chinese-Malaysian cabaret singer mother and Māori soldier father. Her 1997 debut album Drive sold seven times platinum, a local record which she broke in 2002 with Beautiful Collision. Among varied accolades, Runga was made a member of the NZ Order of Merit in 2006. In 2011 she helped compose the soundtrack for cross-cultural romance My Wedding and Other Secrets. At the 2016 NZ Music Awards, she became the youngest artist inducted into the NZ Music Hall of Fame.  

Amadi

Short Film, 2010 (Full Length)

Amadi is a Rwandan refugee struggling with his new life in New Zealand. Alone, patronised in his menial job (he’s called “Africa” by a workmate), and anxious about rescuing his family from his war-torn ‘home’; he forms an unlikely connection with the prickly lady living next door. Directed by 2009 Spada New Filmmaker of the Year, Zia Mandviwalla, Amadi joined Eating Sausage, Clean Linen, and Cannes-selected Night Shift to form a quartet of Mandviwalla-made shorts exploring cross-cultural collision. It screened at Melbourne and Hawaii international film festivals.

A Cat Among the Pigeons

Television, 1992 (Full Length)

In the late 80s the creation of a new public park in central Wellington became an act of cross-cultural collaboration, and an infamous battlezone between artist, council and naysayers. Following positive feedback over her design, council staff decided that redevelopment of Pigeon Park (an old pa site) would be led by Māori artist Shona Rapira Davies. This doco follows the passionate, stroppy Rapira Davies, as she fights cost overruns, landscape architects and passersby, and for her vision (which involved handcrafting Te Aro park's 20,000 plus ceramic tiles).