Weekly Review No. 200 - Flying Out from Germany

Short Film, 1945 (Full Length)

This edition of the National Film Unit’s wartime newsreel series tracks the 1000s of New Zealand prisoners of war being repatriated from Germany, shortly after VE Day. “Men from all over the world are here. Waiting to get out. Waiting to get back to their homes …” The ANZACs travel to a transit centre in Brussels, where they enjoy “a first real beer in years” and go sightseeing, before crossing the North Sea to be hosted in England, where thoughts turn south. The reel ends with a rousing rendition of the Māori Battalion marching song in an English pub.

New Artland - Reuben Paterson (Series Two, Episode 12)

Television, 2009 (Full Length Episode)

Hosted by musician and artist Chris Knox, this series pairs Kiwi artists with communities to create epic works of art. Reuben Paterson, who is well-known for using glitter and big bold patterns, heads to Bethells Beach in West Auckland to create an optical illusion on the black sand shoreline. Locals, including mayor Bob Harvey, pick up shovels to create the masterpiece, racing against the clock before high tide arrives. A relaxed Paterson pushes on, despite plans going awry. "I’m so used to doing big art projects, we’ve got to think positive and that everything is possible.”

Lull

Blindspott/Blacklistt, Music Video, 2006

Shot near Anawhata Beach, west of Auckland, this clip from award-winning music video director Sam Peacocke (Manurewa, Shihad - Beautiful Machine) offers shades of classic Vincent Ward film Vigil, thanks to its images of moody rural landscapes, and kids watching bleak relationships go bad. Blindspott perform the track against foreboding macrocarpas which have a life of their own. The clip was judged Best Rock Video in the 2007 Vodafone Juice TV Awards.

Holmes - Robin Williams

Television, 1996 (Excerpts)

In this interview publicising 1996 comedy The Birdcage, Robin Williams turns his humour settings to a surprisingly low level. Quizzed on matters political by Holmes reporter Ewart Barnsley, Williams argues that politically correct people can display the “same kind of repressive tendencies” as others, and admits that the portrait of homosexual parents in the Mike Nichols-directed comedy could be offensive to both gays and straights. But, he adds, the majority of viewers "go and laugh their ass off and find some common ground and humanity in it”. 

War Years

Film, 1983 (Full Length)

This 1983 film looks at New Zealand in World War II, via a compilation of footage from the National Film Unit’s Weekly Review newsreel series, which screened in NZ cinemas from 1941 to 1946. It begins with Prime Minister Savage’s “where Britain goes, we go” speech, and covers campaigns in Europe, Africa and the Pacific, and life on the home front. The propaganda film excerpts are augmented with narration and graphics giving context to the war effort. Helen Martin called it "a fascinating record of documentary filmmaking at a crucial time in the country’s history".

Series

Housiewives

Television, 2018

This comedic PI/Kiwi web series offers up a West Auckland whodunnit. Kala and Chaka's church hall fundraiser rakes in the cash, but before anyone can celebrate, the money is stolen from the kitty. The close-knit circle of housie lovers and churchgoers eye each other distrustfully, 'mouths are running', and robbery isn't the only scandalous activity going down in Avondale. Housiewives won funding from Skip Ahead, a joint NZ On Air/YouTube initiative aimed at helping Kiwi storytellers reach new audiences. The cast includes singer Bella Kalolo and actor Shushila Takao (Filthy Rich).

Burning Yearning

Short Film, 1989 (Full Length)

This short animated comedy offers up a pre-Wellywood tale of Hollywood coming down under. In the fictional West Coast town of Whatawhopa, a horror movie film crew has arrived to take advantage of the town's persistent rain. When the forecast fails, the town’s lazy fire fighters — “burning and yearning for a fire”— are finally sparked into action. The National Film Unit production was directed by Bob Stenhouse (Oscar-nominated for The Frog, the Dog and the Devil) who is clearly relishing the chance to go to town on scenes of rain, lightning, fire and monsters with droopy eyes.

Rachel Lang

Writer

Writer Rachel Lang, MNZM, has played a major hand in a host of New Zealand television dramas, including Outrageous Fortune, the iconic saga of a West Auckland family trying to go straight. Her CV also includes the long-running Go Girls, small town dramas Jackson's Wharf and Mercy Peak, plus Westside, The Almighty Johnsons, This is Not My Life, Filthy Rich and The Blue Rose.

Maurice Gee

Writer

Maurice Gee, who was named an Arts Foundation icon in 2003, is one of New Zealand's most acclaimed writers. His work for the screen includes creating 80s kidult series The Fire-Raiser and The Champion. Gee's novels have also inspired a number of adaptations, notably classic sci-fi series Under the Mountain and movie In My Father's Den

New Zild - The Story of New Zealand English

Television, 2005 (Full Length)

New Zealand's unique accent is often derided across the dutch for its vowel-mangling pronunciation ("sex fush'n'chups", anyone?) and being too fast-paced for tourists and Elton John to understand. In this documentary Jim Mora follows the evolution of New Zealand English, from the "colonial twang" to Billy T James. Linguist Elizabeth Gordon explains the infamous HRT (High Rising Terminal) at the end of sentences, and Mora interprets such phrases as "air gun" ("how are you going?"). Lynn of Tawa also features, in an accent face-off with Sam Neill and Judy Bailey.