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Collection

The Waitangi Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Jock Phillips begins his journey through our Waitangi collection by recalling an awkward encounter with a security guard at the treaty grounds. Wandering 50 years between the first film in this collection and the last, Phillips explores changing attitudes to the Treaty. Discover everything from Mike King on the treaty trail, to trench warfare, waka-building and epic drama.

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Collection

Labour Day Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Labour Day commemorates the struggle for an eight-hour working day. Kiwi workers were among the first in the world to claim this right — in 1840, carpenter Samuel Parnell won an eight-hour day for workers in Wellington. This collection brings together 20 titles that involve Kiwi working life: from economic revolutions and an industrial dispute negotiated live on air (Post Office Go Slow), to public service comedy Gliding On and a portrait of union leader Ken Douglas.

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What Really Happened - Waitangi

Television, 2011 (Full Length)

This docudrama follows an imaginary news reporter who travels back in time to cover the days leading up to the Treaty of Waitangi’s signing on 6 February 1840. Dropping the usual solemnity surrounding Aotearoa’s founding document, it uses humour and asides to camera to evoke the chaos and motives behind the treaty. Written by Gavin Strawhan, with input from novelist Witi Ihimaera, What Really Happened screened on TVNZ for Waitangi Day 2011. Its nominations at the Aotearoa TV Awards included Best Drama, director (Peter Burger) and actor Jarod Rawiri (who played Hōne Heke). 

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Lost in Translation 1 - The Beginnings (episode one)

Television, 2009 (Full Length)

Comedian Mike King retraces the 1840 journey of the nine sheets of the Treaty of Waitangi in this 10-part series. The introductory first episode explores the epiphany that inspired King to embark on “his dream project”. He rues his Treaty ignorance and lack of te reo, shares his struggle with memory loss since he suffered a stroke in 2006; and makes an emotional return home to learn about his link to the Treaty via his tīpuna. After debuting on Waitangi weekend, 8 February 2009, Dominion Post critic Linda Burgess called it “dignified, conciliatory, informative.”

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Lost in Translation 3 - The Waitangi Sheet (episode three)

Television, 2009 (Full Length)

This third episode of Mike King’s Treaty series heads north. After the 43 signatures at Waitangi on 6 February 1840, Queen Victoria decreed that more were needed for the Treaty to gain legitimacy, and Governor Hobson took the Waitangi Sheet to the people. King talks to Professor Pat Hohepa about the role of missionaries, and his tīpuna Mohi Tawhai. He visits key Northland locales — where he hears of anti-Treaty Pākehā like ‘Cannibal’ Jack Marmon — and meets a descendant of Nopera Panakareao, who recalls his ancestor’s famous shadowy reading of the Treaty.

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Series

Lost in Translation

Television, 2009

Inspired by an epiphany at the Waitangi Treaty grounds in 2000, and after learning New Zealand’s founding document was actually several pieces of paper, comedian Mike King went on a quest to learn the stories behind Te Tiriti O Waitangi. King traces the 1840 path of the nine sheets as it accrued its 540 signatures, meets Māori and Pākehā descendants of those involved, and connects with his Māori heritage. The 10-part series screened on Māori Television. Dominion Post critic Linda Burgess acclaimed it as “dignified, conciliatory, informative ...”

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Lost in Translation 5 - The Bay of Plenty Sheet (episode five)

Television, 2009 (Full Length)

This fifth episode of comedian Mike King’s Treaty discovery series goes on the trail of the two sheets that travelled around the Bay of Plenty in 1840. One, carrying a forged signature, travelled east with young trader James Fedarb (King asks why, despite gathering 26 signatures in 28 days, the salesman is largely missing from the history books); the other went south with a pair of missionaries. King learns about the Te Arawa and Tūwharetoa refuseniks from Paul Tapsell — and from Tamati Kruger, the reason Fedarb didn’t venture into Tūhoe territory.

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Michael Noonan

Writer

Michael Noonan is a legend in New Zealand scriptwriting, and not just because he was amongst the first to prove you could actually make a living at it. Creator of landmark New Zealand shows The Governor and Close to Home, Noonan's work has often explored ideas of power and social injustice.

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Mike King

Comedian, Presenter

Mike King has spent his life cracking people up, although it hasn't always been easy to laugh himself. Starting out in stand-up, he began a long TV career as a comedian, chat show host, reality star and presenter of the acclaimed Lost in Translation. From the face of New Zealand Pork to animal rights activist, from addict to suicide prevention campaigner, King's progression has been nothing if not eclectic.