Artist

Goodshirt

First noticed at the beginning of the new millennium thanks to quirky single, 'Green', alt-rockers Goodshirt — made up of brothers Rodney and Murray Fisher, and Gareth Thomas and Mike Beehre — released their first album, Good, in 2001. It fuelled several clever videos and the number one hit single, 'Sophie', which took away Single and Songwriter of the Year at the 2003 NZ Music Awards. Good went on to be released in Australia, Canada and Japan. Fiji Baby followed in 2004, throwing up the hits ‘Buck It Up' and ‘Lucy'. The band made a lowkey return in 2012 with single 'So Charming' and EP Skinny Mirror.

Making Music - Goodshirt

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

Rodney Fisher and Gareth Thomas from Auckland band Goodshirt preach a DIY message, in this episode from a series directed at secondary school music students. In the backyard of the house where they made their debut album, they perform stripped back versions of 'Slippy' (inspired by a Grey Lynn bus ride) and 'Blowing Dirt'. There's also a guided tour of the back shed where they built a recording studio with accessibly priced equipment that was good enough to produce a chart topping single in 'Sophie' — and stop them going into debt to a record company. 

Sophie

Goodshirt, Music Video, 2002

How long does it take to remove all the furniture and fittings from an apartment? If you’ve got band Goodshirt on the case, apparently three minutes and 45 seconds. One of a series of Goodshirt music videos directed by Joe Lonie, all of them filmed in one continuous take, this clip highlights the dangers of having the volume up too loud. As a young woman listens to Goodshirt’s latest single, she is unaware she is being robbed her of everything she owns. Sophie took away three gongs at the 2003 NZ Music Awards: Best Video , Best Single and Songwriter of the Year.

Buck It Up

Goodshirt, Music Video, 2003

With her second ever video, director Kezia Barnett established herself as a major industry talent. Buck It Up won Best Group Video at the Juice TV Awards 2004.   "I went to art school with Rodney. At one school ball he was the Queen of the Ball and I was the King! The video idea was influenced by my brush with death and hospital stay earlier that year. Needless to say I was delirious and had visions. You can see the band pop up throughout the video - especially Rodney." Kezia Barnett - March 09 

Blowin' Dirt

Goodshirt, Music Video, 2001

Goodshirt's attention-grabbing promos were typified by high concepts rendered with low-budget No 8 wire smarts — often with game participation from the band members. This mind-bending creation by director (and ex-Supergroover) Joe Lonie is no exception: a Mazda 929 (or an Austin 1300, if you watch the video's other version) is re-deconstructed, before leaving in a cloud of smoke, loaded with frog men. Lead singer Rodney Fisher gives the standout performance. He had to sing every lyric backwards to achieve the desired time-warping end result. 

Artist

Zed

Zed was part of a wave of turn of the century guitar bands (The Feelers, Goodshirt) that found local chart success. The band was formed under manager Ray Columbus, when Nathan King, Ben Campbell and Adrian Palmer were students at Christchurch's Cashmere High School. Andrew Lynch joined in 2000. The same year Silencer debuted at number one; it won Album of the Year at the 2001 NZ Music Awards and produced hit ‘Renegade Fighter’ (which also featured in a long-running Rebel Sports campaign). The band's second and final album This Little Empire (2003) followed in both Kiwi and United States versions.

Can't Get Enough

Supergroove, Music Video, 1994

It had to be a big ask getting all seven members of Supergroove in one shot and looking good for this video, but the result trips along with pace, great upside down special effects, and some bonus goldfish. Shot in one epic, 18 hour session, Can't Get Enough was one of the earliest Supergroove videos directed by bassist Joe Lonie, who went on to helm 50+ clips for everyone from King Kapisi to Goodshirt. In 1995 'Can't Get  Enough' was the first of a trio of Supergroove videos to take away the supreme award for Best New Zealand Music Video of the year.

Interview

Brendan Smyth: NZOA and Kiwi music...

Interview and direction - Ian Pryor. Camera and editing - Alex Backhouse.

Brendan Smyth was charged with getting more New Zealand music on the airwaves for more than two decades. As long-time NZ Music Manager at NZ On Air, he led a team that funds and promotes Kiwi music and music videos.

Duncan Cole

Cinematographer

Cinematographer Duncan Cole has trained his lens on big screen hip hop wannabes (Born to Dance), stuntmen (The Devil Dared Me To), rapists (For Good) and strange magicians (The Last Magic Show). The last won Cole an NZ Screen Award. The movie credits sit atop a slate of shorts, commercials and music videos — including one-shot wonder Sophie, for Goodshirt (made with regular collaborator Joe Lonie).

Joe Lonie

Director

Joe Lonie began making music videos while playing bass for legendary band Supergroove. Since then his 60 plus music clips — four of them Tui award-winners — have included one-shot wonders Gather To The Chapel (for Liam Finn) and Blowin’ Dirt (for Goodshirt). On top of a busy commercials career, and a Cannes Gold Lion award, Lonie began adding drama to his CV in 2012, thanks to two short films set in a moving vehicle: foulmouthed, festival-hopping taxi tale Honk if You're Horny, and rock band short Shout at the Ground. He also directed South Auckland-set web series The Factory.