Housebound

Film, 2014 (Trailer)

Described as “bloody brilliant” by horror legend Peter Jackson, Housebound follows a woman dealing with the triple threats of house arrest, potential ghosts, and having to live with her mother. Morgana O’Reilly (TV movie Safe House) is the criminal facing eight months home detention with an annoying Mum (Rima Te Wiata). Jaquie Brown Diaries director Gerard Johnstone’s film debut won near universal praise, and the remake rights sold to New Line in the US. Fangoria loved its mixture of "fantastic comedy" and mystery and it was nominated for ten Moas, including Best Film. 

Intrepid Journeys - Myanmar (Jon Gadsby)

Television, 2004 (Full Length Episode)

Jon Gadsby visits Myanmar (formerly Burma) and discovers an achingly beautiful country. But behind endless golden temples and scenes from Kipling, Gadsby finds "a place of contradiction" where many live in abject poverty, controlled absolutely by their military government (most famously the ongoing house arrest of democracy advocate Aung San Suu Kyi). When Gadsby visits, it is not a country to be travelled to lightly. He finds the locals to be open and willing to play host; yet he is struck overall by their "sad beauty".

Kaleidoscope - CK Stead

Television, 1986 (Full Length Episode)

In this Kaleidoscope report, Lorna Hope profiles poet, novelist and critic CK Stead as he resigns from his position as a Professor of English at Auckland University to write full time. Stead is filmed teaching, writing (at his Karekare bach), at home in Parnell, and at Frank Sargeson’s Takapuna house. He discusses his academic career, family life, walking for inspiration, and how he began writing as a teen. He also mentions his novel Smith’s Dream (adapted into 1977 feature film Sleeping Dogs), and how its themes are echoed in the 1981 Springbok Tour protests, where Stead was arrested. 

Rima Te Wiata

Actor

Rima Te Wiata's career has seen her showcasing her diverse talents as an actor (Housebound, Hunt for the Wilderpeople), comedian and impressionist (More Issues), and singer (Little Shop of Horrors) — sometimes all at the same time. In 2017 she was awarded a New Zealand Order of Merit for her work on screen. 

Nicky Marshall

Director

Nicky Marshall studied film in Sydney, before returning home to Aotearoa to make short film Mon Desir. The arresting portrait of a housewife on the edge was invited to complete at the 1992 Cannes Film Festival, in a section devoted to innovative and original filmmaking. She followed it with two tales of adolescence: short Mirage, and hour-long TV drama House of Sticks, in which Kate Elliot debuted as a bulimic 15-year old. Back in Australia, Marshall directed for a number of high profile soaps, then began working as a producer at animation and effects companies. These days she is a business analyst in Sydney.

Rowley Habib (Rore Hapipi)

Writer [Ngāti Tūwharetoa]

Rowley Habib — also known as Rore Hapipi — was one of the first writers to bring a genuinely Māori perspective to New Zealand stage and screen. His play Death of the Land is seen as a landmark in the development of Māori theatre. In 1983 Habib won a Feltex Award for land rights drama The Protestors, part of a trio of pioneering one-off plays for television. Habib passed away on 3 April 2016.

Philly de Lacey

Producer, Executive

Philly de Lacey heads company Screentime New Zealand. De Lacey began in television in 1999. By 2003 she was producing the company’s newly-launched show Police Ten 7; three years later she became managing director at Screentime NZ. The company’s staple of shows ranges across drama (Underbelly: Land of the Long Green Cloud, Siege), and various long-running actuality series (Beyond the Darklands, Marae DIY).

Richard Turner

Director

Richard Turner’s work as a director began with poetry-based works, pioneering Māori works for television, and Squeeze (1980), New Zealand’s first gay-themed feature. Since then he has made films largely in Australia.

Stephen Stehlin

Producer

Stephen Stehlin has been involved with flagship Pacific show Tagata Pasifika for over 30 years. Alongside Ngaire Fuata and John Utanga, he launched SunPix in 2015. The company took over Tagata Pasifika after Television New Zealand outsourced its stable of Māori and Pacific programmes. Of Samoan descent, Stehlin has been honoured as both a Samoan matai chief, and as a Member of the NZ Order of Merit.

Tama Poata

Actor, Writer, Director [Ngāti Porou]

The late Tama Poata's wide-ranging contributions to our culture can be glimpsed through his appearances on-screen: from Poata's campaigns for Māori land rights (in 1975 doco Te Matakite O Aotearoa) and against the Springbok tour (Patu!), to his many acting roles, his move into documentary-making, and as writer of landmark 1987 movie Ngati — the first feature written (and directed) by Māori.