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Perfectly Frank - The Life of a New Zealand Writer

Television, 1998 (Full Length)

Biographer Michael King takes us through the life of pioneering writer Frank Sargeson: from puritanical parents to self-discovery in London, through to decades encouraging an emerging tide of New Zealand writers. The documentary’s most priceless moments are the tales told when four of those writers return to Sargeson’s fabled fibrolite bach, in Takapuna. Kevin Ireland calls it an “oasis, this marvellous place where books ruled supreme”. Sargeson’s purposefuly minimalistic writing style, the doco argues, helped NZ literature find its own voice.

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Crump

Television, 1999 (Full Length)

Barry Crump's iconic deer hunting yarn A Good Keen Man captured Kiwi Boy's Own imaginations. Published in 1960, it quickly sold 300,000 copies, and with Crump cast as an "ironic, laconic sort of super-bushman", made him a famous, if unlikely, literary figure. This award-winning 72-minute documentary chronicles Crump's colourful life. It covers everything from his emergence on the 50s literary scene, to fractured family relationships, violence, a life-changing incident on a bush camp, and religion, to the ads for Toyota utes that reignited Crump's profile in the 80s.

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1951

Television, 2001 (Full Length)

In 1951, New Zealand temporarily became a police state. Civil liberties were curtailed, freedom of speech denied, and the Government used force against its own citizens. Featuring interviews with many who were involved, this film tells the story of the infamous lockout of waterside workers, and the nationwide strike which followed. 1951 won Best Documentary at the 2002 New Zealand Television Awards, and John Bates was named Best Documentary Director. 

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Maurice Shadbolt

Writer, Director

Although best known as a writer, Maurice Shadbolt also did time as a filmmaker. In his 20s he made a number of films at the National Film Unit, as part of a career that encompassed fiction, journalism, theatre and two volumes of autobiography. His classic Gallipoli play Once on Chunuk Bair was made into a feature film in 1992.

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Debra Daley

Writer

Writer Debra Daley’s first TV script, Universal Drive, was adapted from her short story about growing up in the car culture of West Auckland. She went on to write for Gloss and Open House, and create “money and greed” TV thriller The Shadow Trader. She later published novel The Strange Letter Z (1995) and worked as an assessor for the NZ Film Commission. Daley divides her time between London, France and Ireland.

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Julie Christie

Producer

Julie Christie, DNZM, is one of New Zealand's most successful television producers. She built her company, Touchdown Productions, into the country's leading producer of entertainment television and exporter of programme formats. In 2006 she sold Touchdown to global company Eyeworks in a multi-million dollar deal; she stayed on as managing director until 2012.