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Three New Zealanders: Ngaio Marsh

Television, 1977 (Full Length)

Three New Zealanders was a documentary series that looked at the lives of three of NZ's most celebrated writers: Sylvia-Ashton Warner, Janet Frame and Dame Ngaio Marsh. Produced by Endeavour Films (John Barnett), the final chapter of this three-part series centres on internationally acclaimed crime-writer and Shakespearean director Dame Ngaio Marsh. It contains an interview with Marsh in her later years, interspersed with comments from former students and friends, and re-enactments from her novels (with the Blerta crew as players, and John Bach as Hamlet!).

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Love Mussel

Television, 2001 (Excerpts)

A TV network hires actor Kevin Smith to front a documentary about a town divided by an unusual discovery. Gooey Duck — a shellfish with reputed aphrodisiac qualities — has appeared off Ureroa. The quota is owned by a local couple but the rest of the town, big business, the government and the local iwi all have their own ideas. Smith's involvement gets complicated when he innocently consumes the mollusk while watching Prime Minister Jenny Shipley on TV. Writer Stephen Sinclair satiries television, celebrity, gender, politicis, small town New Zealand and penises.

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Terence Bayler

Actor

After starring in feature Broken Barrier — the only New Zealand feature made in the 1950s — Terence Bayler departed for England, to continue a six-decade long acting career that encompassed Monty Python, William Shakespeare and Harry Potter. Born in Wanganui on 24 January 1930, Bayler passed away in England on 2 August 2016.

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John Banas

Writer, Actor

Beginning as an actor, writer and director in local theatre during the 70s, John Banas increasingly focused on dramatic writing for television from the 80s on. After relocating to Australia, he established himself as a prolific TV screenwriter with a string of iconic shows, including Blue Heelers and City Homicide. His New Zealand scripts include award-winning telemovies Siege and How to Murder Your Wife.

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Rima Te Wiata

Actor

Rima Te Wiata's career has seen her showcasing her diverse talents as an actor (Housebound, Hunt for the Wilderpeople), comedian and impressionist (More Issues), and singer (Little Shop of Horrors) — sometimes all at the same time. In 2017 she was awarded a New Zealand Order of Merit for her work on screen. 

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Anzac Wallace

Actor

Anzac Wallace made one of the most memorable debuts in New Zealand cinema when he starred as avenging guerilla leader Te Wheke in Geoff Murphy's 1983 'Puha Western' Utu. The former trade union delegate followed it with roles in movies The Silent One (1984), Mauri (1988) and pioneering Māori TV series E Tipu E Rea.

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Carmel McGlone

Actor

Tawa-raised Carmel McGlone drifted into acting while studying music. Since then she has performed on both sides of the Tasman, and played Aunt Daisy, Lady Macbeth, Marilyn Monroe, and a gormless male in Digger and Nudger. McGlone’s first sizable screen role was an “enormously enjoyable” six months on 80s TV series Marching Girls. More recently she appeared in web hit Reservoir Hill, and starred in Hook, Line and Sinker.

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Judith Gibson

Actor

Judith Gibson's stage career has included turns as Lady Macbeth, Desdemona, Ophelia and Blanche DuBois — and she has directed more than a dozen plays. There have also been occasional screen roles, alongside teaching acting and dance across the country: she portrayed no-nonsense best friend to Annie Whittle in 1984 movie Trial Run, and later stole the screen as a villainous cosmetics tycoon in User Friendly.