Collection

The World War I Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

More than 100,000 New Zealanders served overseas in World War l. Over 18,000 died; at least 40,000 more were wounded. Campaigns involving Kiwis, from Gallipoli to the Western Front, were identity-forming, and the war's effects on society were deep. The World War l Collection is an evolving onscreen remembrance. Military expert Chris Pugsley writes about the collection here. 

Loading Docs 2015 - Please Open

Web, 2015 (Full Length)

This 2015 edition in the Loading Docs series explores the past, present and future of Crystal Palace, a dilapidated but stately theatre on Auckland’s Mt Eden Road that has been drawing the curtains since the 1920s. Co-directed by Karl Sheridan and Robin Gee, who work under the Monster Valley moniker, the documentary canvasses the spilled Jaffas, dances, surf film screenings and local legends of the venue — and is also a plea to bring the ballroom and cinema back to life. In March 2016 Monster Valley answered their own call, and took over management of the theatre.

The Reel People of New Zealand

Short Film, 2016 (Full Length)

Half-hour documentary The Reel People of New Zealand visits boutique cinemas, from Te Awamutu’s Regent Theatre to Stewart Island’s Bunkhouse. The changing landscape of movie-watching is revealed through visits to legendary Christchurch video store Alice (which has added a screening venue) to Opunake’s community-owned Everybody’s Theatre and Wanaka’s compact Rubys Cinema. The interviews include cinema and video store managers, tales of getting married in a cinema, and contrasting views on whether the death of cinema is unlikely or inevitable. 

Weekly Review No. 60 - The First Episode

Short Film, 1942 (Full Length)

Despite the misleading numbering, this October 1942 film marked the first of the National Film Unit's long-running Weekly Review series. The NFU had been established a year earlier to promote the war effort via newsreels screened in movie theatres. In a meta first clip, Kiwi soldiers watch an NFU film in a makeshift outdoor cinema. Then war readiness is demonstrated via army exercises — including on Waitangi Treaty Grounds, where “Māori and Pākehā are working together, mounting machine guns for their common defence.” Finally: Red Cross parcels are prepared for NZ prisoners of war.

Solo

Film, 1977 (Excerpts)

Solo is a story about three people on the edge of nowhere, struggling to decide how much of themselves to share with those they care about. Young Australian hitchhiker Judy romances solo Dad Paul, who finds peace flying fire patrol planes above the forest. Paul's precocious son reacts badly to losing pole position to Judy, and takes to the air. Inspired partly by the oft-painful times when we are "more acutely in touch” with our emotions, Tony Williams' romance helped launch the Kiwi movie renaissance. But as he writes in the backgrounder, there was no fun in filming it three times. 

Clive Sowry

Archivist

Should Clive Sowry ever choose to enter Mastermind, his knowledge of the National Film Unit will give his competitors a definite run for their money. Sowry worked at the government filmmaking organisation for 14 years, including nine as the NFU's archivist. He went on to undertake a programme that saved 100s of local films, and has written often about filmmaking in New Zealand — including for NZ On Screen.  

Scott Reynolds

Director, Writer

Known for his stylish reinventions of familiar genres, Scott Reynolds followed successful short A Game with No Rules, with rave reviews and a host of awards for his debut feature, serial killer tale The Ugly. Two further movies — Heaven and When Strangers Appear — have followed.

Arthur Everard

Director, Censor

Arthur Everard spent almost two decades making films for the National Film Unit, including directing award-winning rugby short Score and joining the team behind Commonwealth Games doco Games ’74. In 1984, Everard became New Zealand’s Chief Film Censor, a position he held for six years.

Michael Hacking

Director, Editor

After learning how to cut film at legendary indie company Pacific Films in the 1970s, Michael Hacking moved into directing while working for TVNZ. Since directing for 1987 series Journeys in National Parks, his work as a director, producer, and writer for Natural History New Zealand has taken him around the globe.

Cyril Townsend

Cinematographer

Lifelong film fan Cyril Townsend began working part-time as a projectionist at the age of 15. After WWll he was a camera salesman, cameraman — including filming the 1953 royal tour — and did extended sessions managing cinemas around the Hutt Valley. Rarely without a camera, Townsend began shooting for the new medium of television in the early 60s. Retired to Paraparaumu, he died in late 2010, aged 92.