Collection

The Horse Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection celebrates all things equine on New Zealand screens. Since the early days of the colony, horses have been everything from nation builders (Cobb & Co) to national heroes (Phar Lap, Charisma) to companions (Black Beauty) to heartland icons. Whether work horse, war horse, wild horse, or show pony, horses have become a key part of this (Kiwi) way of life.

The New Zealand Thoroughbred

Short Film, 1950 (Full Length)

This short film looks at New Zealand's thoroughbred scene in its post-war boom period. In 1950 New Zealand boasted the most thoroughbreds in the world by population, 200 stallions and 5000 brood mares. Some of the most famous sires of the time are featured as the film makers visit the leading studs of the day. The film begins with the outdoor birth of a foal at Alton Lodge (then owned by industrialist Sir James Fletcher and his son); and also visits Inglewood, near Christchurch: the oldest thoroughbred stud still standing a stallion in New Zealand.

The Promise - Sir Tristram's Story

Television, 1996 (Excerpts)

This documentary tells the story of how an unpromising horse with a nasty personality became the greatest thoroughbred stud stallion in New Zealand racing history. Interviews and archive footage are used to tell the entwined histories of Sir Tristram and his owner, Cambridge-based breeder Patrick Hogan. The path to success involves fires, potentially disastrous injuries, a $32 million buy offer, and special precautions every time Sir Tristram was taken out of his paddock for breeding.

Workhorse to Dreamhorse

Television, 2001 (Excerpts)

The major contribution made by horses to New Zealand’s development is investigated in this Bryan Bruce documentary – from the first to arrive (a stallion brought by missionary Samuel Marsden in 1814) to equestrian gold medallists and sires of Melbourne Cup winners in more recent years. This excerpt features extensive archive footage of some of the 10,000 horses sent to Europe and the Middle East during World War I (with only four returning); and talks to one of the last milk vendors to use a horse and cart (only retired with very mixed feelings in 1984).

Jay Laga'aia

Actor

Auckland-born Jay Laga’aia is the proverbial man of many talents. A busy trans-Tasman career as actor/performer has seen him performing on stage (The Lion King) and screen (Street Legal, Water Rats, Star Wars).

Jodie Rimmer

Actor

Jodie Rimmer began acting as a teen, in trans-Tasman TV tale Rogue Stallion. Since then her screen resume has displayed her versatility: from starring as a prostitute in debut feature I’ll Make You Happy, to playing real-life journalist Donna Chisholm (Until Proven Innocent), a duplicitous villian (Shortland Street), an Amazonian (Young Hercules), and an award-winning turn as Matthew Macfadyen’s ex-flame in In My Father’s Den.

Tom Parkinson

Producer

Veteran producer Tom Parkinson has worked with some of New Zealand television's most popular comedians, including David McPhail, Jon Gadsby, and the late Billy T James (who he discovered in an Avondale Rugby League club). He also directed adventure series Hunter's Gold — whose international success helped launch a run of Kiwi-made children's dramas — and produced many international co-productions.

Peter Sharp

Director

Peter Sharp is one of New Zealand's most prolific directors of screen drama. Though his directing work covers the gamut from police shows and soap satires to live performance, Sharp is best known for his work helming kidult dramas - including Maurice Gee period tales The Fire-Raiser and The Champion. He also directed award-winning mini-series Erebus: the Aftermath.

John Blick

Cinematographer, Director

After starting his filmmaking career at the National Film Unit, cinematographer John Blick has shot many iconic Kiwi commercials, done extended time in Asia and the United States — and worked alongside everyone from Brian Brake and Peter Jackson (The Frighteners), to Skippy the Bush Kangaroo.

Pete Smith

Actor [Te Rarawa, Te Aupōuri]

Pete Smith made his screen debut with a GOFTA-winning role as one of the last people on earth, in classic sci-fi film The Quiet Earth (1985). Smith found acting after being welcomed onto the marae for his father's tangi. Keen to rediscover his ancestry and a "better life", he joined a drama course run by mentor Don Selwyn. His CV includes playing a detective in Plainclothes, a gang leader in What Becomes of the Broken Hearted? and an award-winning role in TV series The Market. Smith went on to present and co-create Far North gardening show Maramataka - Once Were Gardeners, and to star in 2010 movie Hugh and Heke.