25 Years of Television - Part One

Television, 1985 (Full Length)

“It’s hard to imagine our way of life before the box turned up in our living rooms.” Newsreader Dougal Stevenson presents this condensed history of New Zealand television’s first 15 years: from 60s current affairs and commercials, to music shows and early attempts at drama. The first part of a two-part special, this charts the single channel days of the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation from its birth in 1960 until puberty in 1975, when it was split into two separate channels. Includes recollections from many of NZ TV’s formative reporters and presenters.

50 Years of New Zealand Television: 1 - From One Channel to One Hundred

Television, 2010 (Full Length Episode)

The opening episode of the Prime TV series celebrating 50 years of New Zealand television travels from an opening night puppet show in 1960, through to Outrageous Fortune five decades later. It traverses the medium's development and its major turning points (including the rise of programme-making and news, networking, colour and the arrival of TV3, Prime, NZ On Air, Sky and Māori Television). Many of the major players are interviewed. The changing nature of the NZ living room — always with the telly in pride of place as modern hearth — is a story within the story.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 2, Series One, Episode Two

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of Chris Stapp and Matt Heath's bawdy, bogan, BSA baiting TV variety series spoof is a Bullying Special featuring 12 year old, gingered-headed Maurice (from the South Island) futilely attempting to make new friends in a typical Auckland school. Meanwhile, Constables Rob Bogan and Neville Pratt deal out an "art lesson they won't forget" to unsuspecting graffiti artists. Stuntman Randy Campbell's "dangerous, reckless and bloody stupid" attempt to jump off the back of the studio results in yet another "dark day for the NZ stunt industry".

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 3, Series One, Episode Three

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

In this episode of Back of the Y, Chris Stapp and Matt Heath concentrate on drugs. Convinced that all students are on drugs, the constables travel to Dunedin to deal to the local scarfie population. Meanwhile a baggy-trousered, inner city pothead journeys into the backblocks in search of a cannabis mother lode in 'Te Puke Thunder'. A new feature introduces "extreme" cameraman Wally Simmonds (profiling a sight impaired skate team) and stuntman Randy Campbell has to cope with his team's incompetence as well as his own.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 6, Series One, Episode Six

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

In this episode of Chris Stapp and Matt Heath's bawdy, wilfully dodgy series, studio band Deja Voodoo have been fired after the police raid in the previous episode. But replacements, The Warlocks of Firetop Mountain, lack the "sharp suits and sharp tunes" that presenter Danny Parker is looking for in a band. There's an extended episode of but the real focus is on stuntman Randy Campbell's last despairing attempt to succeed at even the simplest challenge. His inevitable failure extracts a terrifying toll.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 4, Series One, Episode Four

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of Chris Stapp and Matt Heath's bawdy, bad taste series promises "action packed action". The constables need the assistance of the Onehunga Armed Offenders Squad to deal to the threat posed by a small boy with a water pistol. Host Danny Parker interviews "retarded South Island mechanic" Spanners Watson about the increase in mechanical incompetence and hospitalisations since he joined stuntman Randy Campbell's crew. Campbell's stunt will only ever end one way. "NZ's number one porn detective" Smoodiver also debuts.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 7, Series One, Episode Seven

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

The final episode of Chris Stapp and Matt Heath's bawdy, bogan, BSA baiting TV variety series spoof opens with a tribute to "People's Presenter" Danny Parker who was a victim of the previous episode's carnage. Show regular Piers Graham looks behind the scenes at the show's imagined past (including 60s exploitation pic 'Datura Flowers of the Garden of Death') and the real injuries sustained by cast members in the show's stunts; and hapless mechanic Spanners Watson get his chance to assume daredevil stuntman Randy Campbell's hopeless mantle.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 5, Series One, Episode Five

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

In this episode of the "greatest TV show on earth", the ape set on fire in the show's first episode  when Randy Campbell's stunt went "horribly wrong"  has escaped, and the hairy one is after vengeance. Meanwhile the police show no sympathy for presenter Danny Parker and daredevil Campbell, for the way the show has portrayed them. And against all odds, Spanners Watson's rocket car 'The Spirit of Russell Crowe' might actually work ... but the ape and the police are closing in.

Nice One - Dave Mahoney

Television, 1977 (Excerpts)

Nice One was an after-school programme on TV ONE, whose host Stu Dennison became a cult hit with his ‘Nice one Stu-y!’ character and sign-off. Here Radio Windy DJ Dave Mahoney sits down for an interview, inbetween slots working the mic. He talks about how he got into announcing, differences between a drive time and breakfast host, and being set on fire while reading the news. Mahoney chugs away on a ciggie (smoking on a kids’ show? It must be the 70s). It’s a high of 11 degrees in Wellington, and Al Stewart is on the turntable singing ‘Year of the Cat’.

Series

Nice One

Television, 1976–1978

Nice One has become a legend in New Zealand children's TV: with the show's signature theme tune ('Nice one Stu!') and Stu's thumbs-up salute, totemic for kids of the era. On the show, host Stu Dennison played a cheeky pony-tailed schoolboy who delighted children and infuriated adults with his irreverent antics. Dennison developed the persona in live segments on Ready to Roll, before transporting him to his own after-school programme, filmed at Avalon Studios for TV One. Nice One also featured cooking (with Alison Holst), craft, singing and plenty of humour.