Michèle A'Court

Presenter

Although best known as a stand-up comedian, Michèle A'Court's television experience is wide. Training in journalism and a degree in English Literature and Drama proved useful on her first two screen gigs: as a writer/presenter on kids show What Now?, and as a reporter on youth news series The Video Dispatch. Since then A'Court has acted (Shortland Street, Go Girls), narrated documentaries, and written books. Her many comedy awards include the NZ Comedy Guild Female Comedian of the Decade in 2010. A'Court has appeared on TV's Pulp Comedy7 Days and The Project; she writes a long-running column for Stuff.

Interview

Michele A'Court - Funny As Interview

Michèle A'Court is an award-winning stand-up comedian, an author and a newspaper columnist. 

Interview

Michele A’Court: From kids TV to primetime comedy...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Michèle A’Court's comedy skills have been seen on everything from Pulp Comedy to 7 Days, but she began her screen career as a presenter on kids show What Now?. The multi award-winning comedian and columnist has also been a reporter on youth news show The Video Dispatch and has acted and written for Shortland Street.

Interview

ScreenTalk Short: Michele A'Court

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Michèle A’Court is well-known for her stand-up comedy talents, but she began her screen career as a presenter on kids show What Now?. The multi award-winning comedian and columnist has also been a reporter on youth news show The Video Dispatch;  

Collection

The Waitangi Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Jock Phillips begins his journey through our Waitangi collection by recalling an awkward encounter with a security guard at the treaty grounds. Wandering 50 years between the first film in this collection and the last, Phillips explores changing attitudes to the Treaty. Discover everything from Mike King on the treaty trail, to trench warfare, waka-building and epic drama.

Collection

The World War I Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

More than 100,000 New Zealanders served overseas in World War l. Over 18,000 died; at least 40,000 more were wounded. Campaigns involving Kiwis, from Gallipoli to the Western Front, were identity-forming, and the war's effects on society were deep. The World War l Collection is an evolving onscreen remembrance. Military expert Chris Pugsley writes about the collection here. 

Collection

Better Safe than Sorry

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Long before Ghost Chips, even before "don't use your back like a crane", life in Godzone was fraught with hazards. This collection shows public safety awareness films spanning from the 50s to the 70s. If there's kitsch enjoyment to be had in the looking back (chimps on bikes?!) the lessons remain timeless. Remember: It's better to be safe than sorry.

Collection

TV3 Turns 25

Curated by NZ On Screen team

November 2014 marks 25 years since New Zealand TV’s third channel began broadcasting. This 25th birthday sampler pack looks back at iconic drama (Outrageous Fortune), upstart news shows (Nightline), fresh youth programming (Ice TV, Being Eve) and comedy high watermarks (bro’Town, Jaquie Brown, 7 Days). As the launch slogan said "come home to the feeling!"

Collection

Controversial Crime Stories

Curated by NZ On Screen team

The Crewe murders marked New Zealand's first controversial court case to be played out in the television age. Since then other controversial cases have been the subject of high profile documentaries and dramas. This collection includes Relative Guilt, about the David Wayne Tamihere case, a spirited talk on the David Bain case, and Scott Watson documentary Murder on the Blade?. The latter was directed by Keith Hunter, a leading “miscarriage of justice” filmmaker. Plus watch an excerpt from Bloodlines, and go behind the scenes on film Beyond Reasonable Doubt.

Series

Section 7

Television, 1972

Section 7 was New Zealand’s first urban TV drama series and followed soon after Pukemanu (which was set in a logging town). Taking its name from the Criminal Justice Act section which placed offenders on probation, it focussed on a Probation Service office and addressed issues of the day including new migrants, ship girls and domestic violence. Expatriate Ewen Solon returned from England to take the lead role in a series very much based on British dramas of the time. More popular with critics than the public, Section 7 was limited to 11 half-hour episodes.