In 1975 TV One launched with a flagship 6.30 news bulletin which went largely unchanged with the move to TVNZ in 1980. In a 1987 revamp, it became the Network News with dual newsreaders Judy Bailey and Neil Billington (replaced by Richard Long). In 1988, the half hour programme moved to 6pm. With the advent of TV3 in late 1989, it was rebranded One Network News; and, from 1995, extended to an hour. The ill-fated replacing of Long with John Hawkesby in 1999 saw it make headlines rather than report them. In 1999, there was another name change to One News.

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6.30PM News - Grahame Thorne's Perm

Television, 1983 (Excerpts)

With stints as an All Black, Springbok triallist, sports presenter, National MP, and sometime celebrity chef, Grahame Thorne has experienced his share of fame. But perhaps his hottest 15 minutes came after he dared to present the sports news one day in 1983 ... with a perm. The ensuing national trauma inspired headlines, irate phonecalls, and “curls are for girls” banners at rugby games. Sadly the perm’s freshest incarnation is lost to the archives, and this slightly grown-out version is the only extant evidence of a key moment in Kiwi fashion history.

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6.30PM News - Leeza Gibbons

Television, 1988 (Excerpts)

In 1988 Entertainment This Week’s host Leeza Gibbons and Coronation Street’s Christopher Quinten found love while taking part in a New Zealand Telethon. The pair starred in two of New Zealand’s favourite TV shows and the sight of them falling for each other live in the Christchurch studios was the talk of the country; viewers — like the couple — were literally agape. This 6.30PM News segment re-caps the romance and follows the duo to Arrowtown for a winter stroll. A year later they were married, but by 1991 it was all over. Warning: includes a deep pash.

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6.30PM News - Prince William and the Buzzy Bee

Television, 1983

This excerpt from TV One's 6.30PM News shows a famous photo opportunity from the 1983 Royal Tour downunder by Prince Charles and Princess Diana (with the recently issued baby William in tow). The scene of the doting parents and wee Will sitting on the lawn of Government House in Auckland was broadcast around the world. In front of the paparazzi George's future father bites on the iconic antenna of a Buzzy Bee, the heir apparent’s hair is still on his head, and a winsome Diana’s collar is perhaps not of the style that would later typify the 'People's Princess'.

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6.30PM News - Raoul People

Television, 1988 (Excerpts)

Raoul Island is nearly 1000 kilometres northeast of New Zealand. For this Christmas Day 1988 report, TV One's Kurt Sanders paid a visit to the four-person NZ meteorological team serving there (plus Smelly the dog — “the unchallenged King of the Kermadecs”). Sanders follows future One News weather presenter Karen Olsen (then Karen Fisher) as she milks the cow, and heads through the nikau to take readings in the crater of Raoul’s active volcano. The uniquely-evolved island is now the Department of Conservation's most remote reserve.

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One Network News - Paul Holmes Meets Margaret Thatcher

Television, 1993 (Full Length)

In 1993 Paul Holmes travelled to the UK to meet Margaret Thatcher, who had recently authored "clear and vivid" memoir The Downing Street Years. In this hour-long interview, the outspoken former PM talks NZ anti-nuclear policy (bad), Communism (evil), and sanctions in South Africa (pointless). The horrors of Bosnia, she argues, show what happens when consensus politics win out over strong leadership. An iron lady explosion is only narrowly avoided after Holmes probes Thatcher on David Lange’s comment that meeting her was like being addressed by a Nazi orator.

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One Network News - Protest (2 January 1995)

Television, 1995 (Excerpts)

Television news becomes the news in this brief report from TVNZ. In this excerpt newsreader Tom Bradley explains why the beginning of that night's six o'clock bulletin was delayed for 10 minutes. Earlier a small group of Māori protesters occupied the Auckland studio. They were angered by a decision to suspend Māori language news show Te Karere during the summer holiday period. Police were called and escorted the protesters from the set. Veteran activist Ken Mair said the group believed Māori and Pākehā news should be treated in the same way.

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