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Music Videos - The James Coleman Collection

Selected by James Coleman
2nd June 2009

 Music Videos - The James Coleman Collection

Music Videos - The James Coleman Collection

 James Coleman

Selected by James Coleman

 

Curating the classics

Broadcaster James Coleman brings together a choice selection of New Zealand's best music videos. Coleman - former TV3 and C4 (retro show Flashbacks) host - applied his videometer to size-up thousands of clips from the past 70 years. The result is 130 titles showcasing the art of Aotearoa music video-making. Check out the list and Coleman's raison d'être.  

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The Top 10

 All the Young Fascists

This Mark Albiston-directed clip for Shihad is a phantasmagoria of praying mantids, rock and filament. Epileptic editing, lighting and imagery produce a powerful, frenetic clip, skillfully complementing a politically-orientated song by this iconic band at the height of their career.

 Beautiful Haze

Sean James Donnelly does admirably under a barrage of feather down, fruit, chainsaws, children's toys and muck, in this dreamy slo-mo treasure. This beautiful Lawrence Blankenbyl-directed clip successfully captures the essence of the song, while giving the artist that wonderfully endearing air of self-deprecation.

 Exit to the City

Greg Page’s promo captures the full-throttle energy of The D4, the band NME described as “classic garage punk’n’roll”. D4 provide the punk and Page provides the roll with a literal pedal-to-the-metal concept. Page: “what we ended up with was a piece of magic I've never quite been able to reproduce.”

 F.R.E.S.H

Set "Somewhere in Canterbury", this dazzling clip sets a breakneck pace with around 100 cuts in the first 60 seconds. The costuming and colour palette are out of this world, and Chris Graham's sense of pace, timing and cheeky lightheartedness propel F.R.E.S.H. ("Forever Rhyming Eternally Saving Hiphop") into the stratosphere.

 Fuji

A smokey sake bar at the foot of Mount Fuji pulses with Minuit’s broken beats in a kooky WWII-era gig. Alyx Duncan's lavish clip merges stunning Japanese imagery, set design and costuming, with enchanting choreography to assemble one of NZ's most outstanding music videos.

 Killer Clown

Stuart Page's work is sometimes controversial (AFFCO), often breathtakingly beautiful, and always memorable. Killer Clown is no exception. Delightful colours, simple special effects and outstanding performances merge to produce an engaging yet sickly-sweet malevolence.

 Macchina

Illustrator/director Leah Morgan's beautifully crafted clip for alt-rock three-piece Decortica cleverly captures both angst and beauty through captivating special effects and a stunning palette.

 S.O.S

The unlikely combination of 30s Hollywood and Town Hall knees up work delightfully in this clip from international production luminaries Straighty180. Breathtaking production values and choreography plus a delicate ukulele performance from a grievous looking enforcer mean this clip is headed straight for the pool room.

 Tangaroa

Muscular and intense, this dark, challenging and presumably autobiographical short film boldly brings to life the epiphany and impetus to rebuild following a dark personal struggle.

 You Don't Know Me

One can imagine the concept for Davis' hysterically violent clip looking rather average on paper: "Band beats snot out of each other". But music vid maestro Davis knew what he wanted, and together with hard rockers Autozamm, who take to their bludgeoning with relish - goes right ahead and NAILS it.

Special thanks to:

NZ On Screen would like to thank the musicians, distributors, music video makers and producers for enabling us to create this impressive collection of NZ music videos. Thanks also to Paula Yeoman for the artist biographies, and to James Coleman, Kylie Buck, Alex Backhouse and Catherine Juniot for pulling it all together.

Boh Runga promo exclusive

Boh Runga promo exclusive

To celebrate the collection launch, NZ On Screen presents an exclusive premiere of the promo for Boh Runga’s Evelyn, directed by Tim Van Dammen.

But wait, there's more!

But wait, there's more!

The Top 10 are Coleman’s favourites to emerge from the bullrush, but there are 70 more titles to explore ... and counting, as we roll out the 130+ clip collection.