An iconoclast with a bent for experimentation, director Paul Maunder brought the mixed flavours of social realism and the art house to New Zealand film in the 1960s and 70s, before shifting stages to concentrate on theatre.

Nothing he ever did at the Film Unit was how the Film Unit had ever done it before. Hugh Macdonald

Screenography

4206.thumb.png.540x405

Games 74

1974, Editor, Director - Film

This chronicle of the Christchurch Commonwealth Games marked one of the National Film Unit's most ambitious productions. Though a range of events (including famous runs by John Walker and Dick Tayler), are covered, the film often bypasses the pomp and glory approach; daring to talk to the injured and mentioning that most competitors lose. The closing ceremonies of the "friendly games" feature the athletes gathering to — as the official song's chorus put it — "join together". The directing team included Paul Maunder, Sam Pillsbury, and Arthur Everard.

72.thumb.png.540x405

Gone up North for a While

1972, Director, Writer - Television

After a young woman falls pregnant, she decides to go against the tide of advice from her family and unsympathetic welfare authorities by keeping her baby. Misery and hardship ensues. Director Paul Maunder brought kitchen sink drama to New Zealand television with this controversial National Film Unit production. The story can claim to have effected social change, stirring up public debate about the DPB for single mothers. Keep an eye out for a young Paul Holmes as a moustached wannabe lothario.

4589.thumb.png.540x405

Sons for the Return Home

1979, Director, Writer - Film

Sons for the Return Home tells the story of a Romeo and Juliet romance between students Sione, a NZ-raised Samoan, and Sarah, a middle class palagi. Director Paul Maunder shifts between time and setting (London, Wellington, Samoa) in adapting Albert Wendt's landmark 1973 novel. Sons was the first feature film attentive to Samoan experience in NZ — alongside themes of identity, racism and social and sexual consciousness. In this excerpt Sione meets Sarah's parents, and his tin'a has him scrubbing their Newtown pavement prior to Sarah's reciprocal visit.

4251.01.key.jpg.540x405

Landfall - A Film about Ourselves

1975, Director, Writer, Editor - Film

Escaping the city to camp themselves in rural Foxton, four 20-something idealists set about living off the land. But they bring their urban anxieties with them, and an act of violence forces the commune into isolation and extremism. Teasing tense drama from familiar settings — as if Pasolini took the reins of a Country Calendar special — this maverick Paul Maunder-directed NFU film shines a harsh light on the contradictions of the frontier spirit with stylistic daring. Rarely-seen (TVNZ never screened it), Landfall marked Sam Neill’s feature debut.

Title.jpg.118x104

Notes on a New Zealand City

1971, Director, Writer

Title.jpg.118x104

One of Those People Who Live in the World - The Journey (Part One)

1973, Director, Writer

Title.jpg.118x104

Notes on a New Zealand Town

1971, Writer, Director

10619.thumb.png.540x405

Close to Home

1975 - 1983, Director - Television

Pioneering soap opera Close To Home first screened in May 1975. For just over eight years middle New Zealand found their mirror in the life and times of Wellington’s Hearte clan. At its peak in 1977 nearly one million viewers tuned in twice weekly to watch the series co-created by Michael Noonan and Tony Isaac (who had initially only agreed to make the show on the condition they would get to make The Governor). The popular family saga carved a regular niche for local drama on screen, and the output demands were foundational in developing industry talent.

More information