Robin Laing began her long career as a producer with 1985's Mr Wrong, the first of many projects she has worked on with director Gaylene Preston. In 1993 Laing was awarded a Member of the British Empire (MBE) for services to the New Zealand film industry. 

In the chaos which is filmmaking, Robin Laing provides an oasis of reason and practicality matched with a fine creative sensibility. [...] I have no idea how I’d manage without her. Gaylene Preston

The Vintner's Luck

2009, Producer - Film

Filmed in France, Belgium and New Zealand, The Vintner's Luck is a tale of growing grapes, meeting angels and seeking perfection. Belgian actor Jeremie Renier stars as Sobran, a poor winemaker who one day encounters an angel. The two make a pact. One day each year, as Sobran's fortunes wax and wane, the angel returns to hear more about Sobran's life. Director Niki Caro adapted Elizabeth Knox's bestselling novel with help from US script consultant Joan Scheckel; the film also reunites Caro with Whale Rider discovery Keisha Castle-Hughes, who plays Sobran's wife. 


Perfect Strangers

2003, Producer - Film

One night at the pub Melanie (Rachel Blake) meets a handsome stranger (Sam Neill) and accepts his invitation to go back to his place. When they board his boat she finds out that this is further than she thought (a shack on a deserted island). Once they arrive he treats her like a princess - however it slowly dawns on her that she's been kidnapped. Terrified, she also knows that he's her only way off the island. As events play out in Gaylene Preston's twisted fairytale, Melanie's feelings change from anger and fear - to desire.



2001, Executive Producer - Film

Thomas, Jack and Wayne are best mates. At night they're the Stickmen, who tour the Wellington pub scene playing pool with ever-increasing stakes. These peak when they enter a tournament run by vicious crime boss ‘Daddy'. Can they pocket the money and win the girls? Rothwell's first feature was a Kiwi take on the UK urban underbelly genre (Lock, Stock etc). "Smart, stylish and effortlessly entertaining" (Dominion Post) the film was a hit with the young male demographic and won several 2001 NZ Film and TV Awards (including best director, script, and actor).


Early Days Yet

2001, Consultant Producer - Television

Early Days Yet, directed by Shirley Horrocks, is a documentary about New Zealand poet Allen Curnow, made in the last months of his life. The poet talks about his life and work, and visits the places of some of his most important poems. It includes interviews with other New Zealand poets about Curnow's significance as an advocate for New Zealand poetry. As Curnow famously mused in front of a moa skeleton displayed in Canterbury Museum: "Not I, some child, born in a marvellous year / Will learn the trick of standing upright here."


Thinking about Sleep

1999, Producer


Getting to Our Place

1999, Associate Producer - Television

This documentary is a view into the crucible that forged Te Papa Tongarewa, the Museum of New Zealand, which opened in 1998. Fascinating fly-on-the-wall moments are captured as a new kind of national museum is conceived. This excerpt features a board meeting where Saatchi & Saatchi present branding options. As political, ideological, creative and commercial considerations collide, the frustrations of decision making by committee are palpable: the body language, tears, cautions, grumbles, and finally, smiles, as they settle on the contentious thumbprint logo.


The Imploding Self: A Journey Through the Life of Fergus McLafferty

1995, Producer


Putting our Town on the Map

1995, Producer - Television

This documentary looks at the attempts by New Zealand's small towns to attract attention: ranging from giant statues of fish, fruit, and soft-drink bottles to festivals devoted to local vegetables or wild food. Actress Miranda Harcourt travels from Paeroa to Alexandra to explore the colourful expressions of small-town identity and pride. Shot by Leon Narbey, this was one of a series of documentaries directed by Shirley Horrocks about kiwi popular culture. A book by Claudia Bell and John Lyall (with the same title) was the film's starting-point.


Flip & Two Twisters

1995, Producer - Television

Flip & Two Twisters is a Shirley Horrocks documentary about New Zealand artist Len Lye. Motion maestro Lye's international reputation rests on his work as a filmmaker and kinetic sculptor and his lively contributions to the London and New York avant-garde. The documentary explores Lye's career and ideas, with the help of historical footage and excerpts from his films. It includes footage of Lye in typically exuberant form outlining his process, introduces many of his kinetic works, and documents how some of his most ambitious plans are now being realised in NZ.


War Stories

1995, Executive Producer - Film

In Gaylene Preston's moving documentary, seven elderly women recall their personal experiences of World War II. Their intimate, unadorned stories are filmed talking-heads style, interspersed with personal photographs and period newsreel clips. From tragic love stories to long-suppressed revelations of sex and death, War Stories is a richly revealing touchstone of New Zealand history. It received international acclaim, Kevin Thomas in the LA Times enthused that Preston takes "a simple idea and turns it into a rich, universal experience".



1994, Producer - Short Film

Christine Jeffs made her directing debut with this lush, high end (35mm film, Dolby sound) short film. Dorothy (Fiona Samuel), a lone swimmer, luxuriates in tranquil bliss at a deserted pool — only to have her solitude rudely interrupted by a squad of swimmers. A wordless, strikingly choreographed conflict ensues as Dorothy attempts to assert herself against the dehumanised aggression of the swimmers. Stroke was invited to international festivals including Cannes and Sundance; and Jeffs went on to direct feature films Rain and Sunshine Cleaning.


Bread & Roses

1993, Producer - Film

Released to mark 100 years of women's suffrage in New Zealand, Bread & Roses tells the story of pioneering trade unionist, politician and feminist Sonja Davies (1923 - 2005) who rose to prominence in the 1940s and 50s. Directed by Gaylene Preston and co-written by Graeme Tetley, the acclaimed three-hour film was created for a dual cinema/television release. Australian actor Geneviève Picot (Davies) and Mick Rose (as her husband) were awarded for their roles at 1994’s TV Awards. This excerpt sees Davies take direct action to protest closure of a Nelson railway.


The Making of Bread and Roses

1993, Subject - Television

Mini-series Bread and Roses recreates the early days of trade unionist and politician Sonja Davies. Behind the scenes, the $4 million production required 175 speaking parts, and dozens of sets — many built from plywood, “to make something out of nothing”. This documentary follows director Gaylene Preston and producer Robin Laing from preproduction and filming a dance scene in Wellington Town Hall, to (old-fashioned film) editing. Meanwhile lead actor Geneviève Picot talks about the challenges of portraying a character who often kept her vulnerabilities hidden. 


Matrons of Honour

1992, Producer



1992, Producer


Mother Tongue

1992, Executive Producer


Absent Without Leave

1992, Producer


Xmas for Lou

1992, Producer


Pleasures and Dangers

1991, Producer


Ruby and Rata

1990, Producer - Film

Originally conceived as a TV series, Gaylene Preston's comedy was a local hit, uplifting recession-era audiences with a plucky misfits saga. Ruby (Yvonne Lawley), an 83 year old trying to dodge a retirement home, rents a room to Rata, a solo mum with sidelines in music and benefit fraud. Rata's son is into arson and shoplifting, while Ruby's nephew (What Now's Simon Barnett) is a hapless yuppie wannabe. Marginalised by the deregulated economy of the 80s and living on their wits, they may just find common cause despite themselves in this Graeme Tetley-penned tale.


Send a Gorilla

1988, Supervising Producer


Dangerous Orphans

1986, Associate Producer - Film

Director John Laing followed acclaimed romance Other Halves with an equally stylish but very different big city tale: a thriller in which three orphans plan an international heist to avenge the killing of one of their fathers. The expected diet of shootings, skulduggery and globetrotting accents is enlived by side trips to Geneva, songs from romantic interest Jennifer Ward-Lealand, and a cast of villains to die for (Peter Bland, Ian Mune, Anzac Wallace, Grant Tilly). When Dangerous Orphans was sold in Europe it set an early record for a New Zealand film.


Mr Wrong

1985, Producer - Film

In director Gaylene Preston genre-bending tale, Meg (Heather Bolton) moves from her parents’ place into a flat and buys a stylish old Jaguar in a drive to be more independent. While driving on a country road, she hears screams in the back – but there's no one there. When she picks up a woman in the rain, she recognises her from a dream. She discovers that this woman was the car's previous owner and she's missing... Now her killer might just be stalking Meg too ... Preston and producer Robin Laing rented out city cinemas, in order to prove their first movie had an audience.


The Lost Tribe

1983, Wardrobe Supervisor - Film

Anthropologist Max Scarry goes missing in Fiordland, while searching for a fabled Māori tribe. The local policeman believes Max broke local tapu. Max's partner Ruth sets off with his twin brother, murder suspect Edward, to try to unravel the mystery. John Laing's second feature attempts an ambitious Hitchcockian plot, and the cast — especially John Bach's terse doppelganger performance — testifies to the talent on hand in the early days of the Kiwi film renaissance. Atmospheric camerawork makes the most of damp Wellington, and remote bush settings.