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Biography

In November 2010 Robyn Malcolm appeared on television to say a heartfelt goodbye to Outrageous Fortune, the show in which her character Cheryl West had become one of New Zealand television's most iconic. Cheryl was part of an impressive acting career that stretches over three decades.

Graduating from drama school Toi Whakaari in 1987, Robyn Malcolm began worked extensively in theatre. In 2003 she won an International Actors Fellowship to study at London's Globe Theatre.

Malcolm made her screen debut in 1989, thanks to this episode of Wellington police series Shark in the Park. But she would first catch the attention of television audiences five years later, after joining the staff of Shortland Street. As nursing manager and mother Ellen Crozier, she quickly lost a husband, accidentally burnt down the house, and got caught up in a complicated love-life — not to mention the complications which can ensue when your ex-boyfriend marries your psychotic sister (Elizabeth Easther). In 1998 Malcolm's character also dealt with the cot death of her child Rose.

During almost six years on the soap, Malcolm earned her first screen nomination for Best Actress at the 1998 Television Awards. Six years after leaving Shortland Street she scored her first screen award for a show which surely drew some inspiration from it: satire Serial Killers, in which she played a stressed out scriptwriter.

Post-Shortland Street, Malcolm founded the New Zealand Actors' Company with Tim Balme, Katie Wolfe and future Outrageous Fortune director Simon Bennett. The company produced and toured successful stage productions throughout the country, before the failure of King Lear.

In 2002 Malcolm was nominated for performance in the title role in tele-movie Clare, based on the cervical cancer experiment at National Women's Hospital. The film's inspiration was Clare Matheson, whose book Fate Cries Enough chronicles how over 15 years she became an unwitting participant in a medical experiment where carcinoma in situ was often left untreated.

In 2005, the same year she was awarded for Serial Killers, Malcolm travelled to France to front documentary Our Lost War: Passchendaele, about the World War I battle in which her great uncle was one of many to lose their lives. 2005 was also the year that she first played Cheryl West, in Outrageous Fortune. Born in the mind of co-creator Rachel Lang as a brasher, more comical take on the white trash family she had created for Mercy Peak, the show would go on to become the longest running drama in New Zealand TV history.

Bringing her substantial experience to the part, Malcolm helped created an iconic character on New Zealand television: feisty, flawed and cleavaged to the hilt, the straight-talking Cheryl battled to keep the West whanau on the straight and narrow, while trying to sort her affections for her criminal husband Wolf (Grant Bowler) and policeman Wayne Judd (Kirk Torrance). By the show's third season, women were turning up in Kiwi hair salons asking for a "Cheryl West". Malcolm argued in 2007 that audiences liked the character "because she's so fallible ... We're not so into that American ideal where everyone must play the hero and act with honour at all odds and be the winner on the day." 

When the final episode of Outrageous Fortune aired in November 2010, it rated better than any in the show's six season run. Along the way Malcolm has stacked up an impressive run of awards and nominations, including 2007 Air NZ Screen Awards for Best Actress, and Qantas TV Awards in 2005 and 2008.

In 2010 Malcolm took another centre stage role with The Hopes and Dreams of Gazza Snell, the first feature from award-winning Insiders Guide director Brendan Donovan. Malcolm played Gail, a woman who feels like an outsider in her own family, thanks to her husband's obsession with go-kart racing. Gazza Snell debuted in the 2010 round of film festivals.

After pitching her idea for Agent Anna, the first series debuted on Television One in January 2013, with a second following in mid 2014. Malcolm was intrigued by the idea of basing a show around a middle-class Mum "with no hint of hero about her", who is forced to enter the highly competitive world of selling real estate. 

She also appeared in Jane Campion's acclaimed mini-series Top of the Lake (as an American chimpanzee owner seeking healing down under), and has increasingly begun to work on Australian projects. Among them are chalk and cheese TV comedy Upper Middle Bogan (in which her screen family is again caught up in motor engines) Rake, which sees her playing swinging wife to a crime-lord, and Sam Worthington surf movie Drift.

Malcolm has also had small acting roles in Kiwi-shot features Perfect Strangers, Absent Without Leave, The Last Tattoo, and Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers


Sources include

Jane Bowron, 'The crumbs around her mouth' (Interview) - The Dominion Post (TV Week pullout), 17 July 2007, Page T3
Diana Wichtel, 'Cheryl and me' (Interview) - The Listener, 28 July 2007, Page 27, Issue 3507
'Robyn Malcolm' (Profile). Outrageous Fortune website. Accessed 27 May 2012
'Robyn Malcolm joins TV ONE in Agent Anna' (Interview) TVNZ website. Accessed 11 March 2013