How Far is Heaven, Christopher Pryor's directorial debut, was described as “stunning” (Sunday Star-Times), “moving” (Listener) and “a genuine triumph” (Capital Times). The film chronicled a year Pryor and co-director Miriam Smith spent in the Whanganui River community of Jerusalem. Prior Pryor credits include multiple collaborations with director Florian Habicht, as both cinematographer and editor. Pryor and Smith followed up How Far is Heaven with small town rugby chronicle The Ground We Won, which won the 2017 NZ Film Award for Best Documentary. Pryor took another gong for his cinematography.

[Jerusalem is a] genuine triumph  [...]. Two deeply held belief systems co-exist in Jerusalem, and the beautifully photographed film presents us with multiple dichotomies  —  Māori and Pākehā, young and old, urban and rural  —  without taking any sides itself. Destined to be one of the greats. Dan Slevin in Capital Times, 29 August 2012
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The Ground We Won

2015, Cinematographer , Editor, Director - Film

Described as "visually ravishing" (The Herald's Peter Calder), "strikingly beautiful"(Metro) and "pure social-commentary gold"(The Listener), The Ground We Won is a movie about men, rugby and the heartland. After discovering small town Reporoa en route to their earlier documentary How Far is Heaven, Christopher Pryor and Miriam Smith felt it the perfect place to chronicle the changing face of small town rugby. The film premiered in April 2015 during an autumn offshoot of the NZ International Film Festival; it was judged Best Documentary at the 2017 New Zealand Film Awards.  

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Airmail

2014, Camera - Short Film

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Helen Clark: The Road to Power

2013, Camera - Television

Family, friends and former foe joined Helen Clark before the cameras for this TV3 documentary, which charts her journey from Vietnam protestor through low-polling Labour Party leader, to long-reigning PM and the UN. In this excerpt, Clark and biographer Denis Welch recall how after becoming opposition leader, Clark was advised to make various changes to her hairstyle and presentation. Featuring appearances by John Key, Don Brash and media-shy husband Peter Davis, the two-part doco was helmed by Dan Salmon and artist/director Claudia Pond Eyley.

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How Far is Heaven

2012, Director, Camera, Editor - Film

The Whanganui River settlement of Jerusalem had a moment in the national spotlight when poet James K Baxter lived there in the early 70s — but it is home to a long established Māori community and the Catholic order of the Sisters of Compassion (since 1892). To make this documentary, Miriam Smith and Christopher Pryor spent a year in Jerusalem, following the lives and interactions of the nuns and the Ngāti Hau. North & South called their observations of a world of co-existing contrasts — Māori and Pākehā, young and old, secular and religious — “a cinematic treat”.

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The Red House

2012, Camera - Film

Director Alyx Duncan set out to make an experimental documentary about her childhood home. What eventually resulted was this acclaimed and award-winning "fictional essay", her first full length feature. Blurring the line between documentary and drama, she cast her conservationist father and Chinese born step-mother as characters partially based on themselves. As they journey from a small NZ island to a big Chinese city, Duncan examines their cross cultural relationship and explores nostalgia, childhood, dreams, environmentalism, globalisation and the meaning of home.

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Amadi

2010, Camera - Short Film

Amadi is a Rwandan refugee struggling with his new life in New Zealand. Alone, patronised in his menial job (he’s called “Africa” by a workmate), and anxious about rescuing his family from his war-torn ‘home’; he forms an unlikely connection with the prickly lady living next door. Directed by 2009 Spada New Filmmaker of the Year, Zia Mandviwalla, Amadi joined Eating Sausage, Clean Linen, and Cannes-selected Night Shift to form a quartet of Mandviwalla-made shorts exploring cross-cultural collision. It screened at Melbourne and Hawaii international film festivals.

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Land of the Long White Cloud

2009, Additional Camera, Creative Consultant - Film

Florian Habicht returns to Northland (home surf and turf and Kaikohe Demolition territory) to chronicle the annual Red Snapper Classic fishing competition. The first prize is $50,000 but the participants chase the joy of the cast as much as the purse. The solitary figures on the epic sweep of Ninety Mile Beach provide striking images, while Habicht teases out their innermost thoughts and some fine homespun philosophy. A 50s era soundtrack is an apt match while the closing underwater sequences are a stunning counterpoint to the anglers' endeavours. 

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Rubbings from a Live Man

2008, Editor, Camera, Co-Creator - Film

Rubbings from a Live Man is a semi-dramatised biography performed by the subject himself — theatre legend Warwick Broadhead. Broadhead recounts his dramatic life story through vignettes featuring his characters. This collaboration with Florian Habicht represents one of the only times Broadhead's performances were captured on film. He describes his upbringing as a lot of cover up and pretence. "Then I went into the world of theatre," he says, "which is cover-up and pretence." Broadhead passed away in January 2015, having predesigned a memorable funeral.

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Clean Linen

2007, Camera - Short Film

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Kete Aronui - Merata Mita

2007, Camera - Television

This episode of the Māori Television series about Aotearoa artists follows Māori screen pioneer Merata Mita. Mita produced vital work anchored in culture and community. This extract concentrates on the occupation of Bastion Point. Mita and protest leader Joe Hawke talk of how 25 May 1978 shaped her concerns as a filmmaker: "It was life, it was a transformation". The documentary includes footage from Bastion Point: Day 507, Patu, Mita's feature Mauri and Utu, and sees her running a lab for indigenous filmmakers. The episode was the 17th screened in Kete Aronui's fifth season.

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Kete Aronui - Taane Mete & Taiaroa Royal

2007, Camera - Television

This episode from series five of Kete Aronui, a documentary series featuring Aotearoa's artists that screened on Māori Television, follows the careers of iconic contemporary dancers Taane Mete and Taiaroa Royal. For both, training at Te Whaea propelled them into their art, teaching them not only technique but also a way of life. Featuring footage of Royal dancing in Douglas Wright's Forever (1993), the excerpt also includes a dance class with Michael Parmenter, another dance great, and discussion of dance companies Limbs and Black Grace.

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Kete Aronui - Richard Nunns

2007, Camera - Television

Richard Nunns is a renowned expert in taonga pūoro — traditional Māori instruments like wood and bone flutes. This 2007 episode of the Māori Television arts show sits down with him as he narrates his collaboration with Brian Flintoff and the late Hirini Melbourne — “a magic coalition of separate skills” — and the journey they’ve undertaken to resurrect lost sounds. Inspired by museum objects, literature and song, the trio led the revival of the form in contemporary Aotearoa. Nunns says the pūoro would’ve functioned as “a cellphone to the divine” for tohunga (experts).

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Kete Aronui - Fiona Pardington

2006, Camera - Television

Episode four, series four of this Māori artists’ profile series, tracks eminent photographer Fiona Pardington. In this extract Pardington works with her brother Neil, and discusses her life path: her Māori roots, wanting to be a photographer at age six, art school, and the hard road to making a living as an artist. Describing her medium as one of mood and depth, her search is for a balance of knowledge and wairua. Includes images of her stunning interpretations of cultural taonga, such as specimens of esteemed (and extinct) huia birds, and carved pounamu.

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Duet (Lonely I Be)

2006, Camera - Music video

Puppetry must feature in any credible video collection. This masterpiece by Florian Habicht and Steve Abel is the obvious choice. Note the uncanny resemblance between Steve and his wobbly little understudy   "Unitec let us use a space for two weeks to build the set. We used moss to make the puppet set, and Kirsten and I were shot in my flat in Kingsland using a green-screen. The puppets have independent careers in Oly Smart's European traveling puppetry show." Steve Abel - April 09

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Sleep in the Garden

2005, Camera, Director - Music video

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Kaikohe Demolition

2004, Camera, Editor, Reporter - Film

The far out meets the Far North in director Florian Habicht's tribute to a community of characters drawn together by a desire to demolition derby. Behind the bangs, prangs, and blow-ups, the heart and soul of a small town — Kaikohe — is laid bare. “Having work as generous and high-spirited as Kaikohe Demolition on the programme makes my job so easy it's embarrassing!”, Bill Gosden, Director of International NZ Film Festivals, 2004. Note: the second clip is a subtitled version of the mud-splattered motorhead-delighting film.

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Woodenhead

2003, Camera, Editor - Film

Innocent Gert, who works in a rubbish dump, can't believe his luck when he's ordered by his imperious boss to take his beautiful mute daughter, Princess Plum, to meet her prospective husband. The two set off on a mythical quest through a fairytale Far North landscape. On the way they encounter freaks and monsters, and experience danger and romance. In an unusual reversal, the voices and music for Woodenhead were all recorded before filming. This surreal debut feature from Elam grad Florian Habicht took Aotearoa to the art house with unprecedented wit, weirdness and wonder.