Kim Harrop describes writing scripts as "the most exhilarating/ challenging/ enlightening/ masochistic/ addictive thing in the world." Harrop spent eight years writing for long-running soap Shortland Street. She has developed several programmes (First Crossings, The NZ Home), as well as writing and producing internet hit The Coffin Club and co-creating black comedy series Fresh Eggs with Nick Ward. 

One really fun scene was where a really crappy Renault Fuego I owned was blown up for one of the Christmas cliffhangers. That was ace! Kim Harrop on favourite Shortland Street scenes that she has helped write

Fresh Eggs

2019, Writer, Creator, Producer - Television

Loading Docs 2017 - The Coffin Club

2017, Writer, Producer - Web

A unique Kiwi story about prepping for death has captured the attention of international media. The BBC, The Guardian and National Geographic have all interviewed elderly members of a build-your-own-coffin club, some of whom feature in this musical short film. Members of the Kiwi Coffin Club don sequins and top hats, while singing about what makes their club tick — death is not to be feared, but instead should be celebrated as a normal part of life. A lyric from this offbeat Loading Doc sums up things succinctly: "It's the final verse but life goes on." 

With Strings Attached

2010 - 2011, Development Producer - Television

The Great Food Escape

2013, Development Producer

Is Modern Medicine Killing You?

2010 - 2011, Development Producer

Atamira

2012, Development Producer - Television

Shortland Street - 20th Anniversary Special

2012, Head Writer - Television

Since a spectacular truck crash just before the Christmas 1995 episode, the Shortland Street team have often pulled out the stops at Christmas time, and other special anniversaries. The 90 minute 20th anniversary special — which won acclaim in May 2012 — was no exception. Aside from Chris Warner being arrested for murder in his hospital bed, a dramatic helicopter crash injures Nurse Nicole Miller, a P addict is loose in the building, a heart has gone missing, and at least six former Shortlanders return. A fashion parade of old costumes from the clinic provides some light relief.

A Kiwi Baker in Shanghai

2011, Development Producer

The Secret Lives of Dancers

2010 - 2011, Development Producer - Television

Go Girls - First Episode

2008, Storyliner - Television

Go Girls starts from a twist, a beach and a promise. The twist is that this femme-dominated tale is narrated by a male (Jay Ryan). The promise involves four friends having a drink on the beach, and agreeing to make a major life-change within a year. Amy (Anna Hutchison) wants to be rich; whacky bartender Britta (Alix Bushnell) seeks fame; straight-talking Cody (Bronwyn Turei) wants a hubbie. The intentionally "optimistic, kind" hit show stretched to five seasons. In the backgrounder, co-creator Rachel Lang writes about the show's origins and difficult, rain-sodden birth.

Are You Ready?

2005, Research, Writer - Television

The Fence

2005, Writer, Story Producer

The Ultimate Challenge

2005, Post-Production Director, Story Producer

Shortland Street - Nick and Waverley's wedding

2002, Storyliner - Television

It was third time lucky for twice-engaged Nick (Karl Burnett) and Waverley (Claire Chitham) to finally make it to the altar. Since first getting together in 1994, viewers had followed Nick (who joined Shortland Street on episode two) and Waverley through sickness and health, estrangement, and even a kidnapping during a previous marriage attempt. Their union was dubbed the TV wedding of 2002. The nuptials saw the return of Marj (Elizabeth McRae) and Jenny Harrison (Maggie Harper). In May 2017 the couple were set to return from Taranaki, for Shortland's 25th anniversary.

Shortland Street

2001 - 2008, 2012 - 2013, Writer, Script Editor, Storyliner, As: Beth Yardley, Head Writer - Television

Shortland Street is a fast-paced serial drama set in an inner city Auckland hospital. The long-running South Pacific Pictures production is based around the births, deaths and marriages of the hospital's staff and patients. It screens on TVNZ’s TV2 network five days a week. In 2017 the show was set to celebrate its 25th anniversary, making it New Zealand’s longest running drama by far. Characters and lines from the show have entered the culture — starting with “you’re not in Guatemala now, Dr Ropata!” in the very first episode. Mihi Murray writes about Shortland Street here.