Jam this Record

Jam This Record, Music Video, 1988

NZ's first house record was a one-off studio project for Simon Grigg, Alan Jansson, Dave Bulog and James Pinker. With a nod to UK act MARRS' indie/electro hit 'Pump up the Volume' — and a sample from Indeep's 'Last Night a DJ Saved My Life' — it briefly featured in the UK club charts. The TVNZ-made music video borrows the record's original graphics (by novelist Chad Taylor) and marries them to a mash-up of 1960s black and white, music related archive footage (including C'mon) with the occasional novelty act and politician added for good measure.

Sheep

Toy Love, Music Video, 1980

The second, double-sided Toy Love single 'Don't Ask Me' / 'Sheep' was released in April 1980 and reached number 10 on the Kiwi pop charts. That year the band signed a contract with Michael Browning — a former manager of AC/DC — and made the move to Sydney, the prize being a studio album and a way bigger audience, but disillusionment soon set in. Sheep jumps out of the gates with driving drums and guitars and lyrics about numbness and confusion, all confirming Toy Love's punk roots. The band wander aimlessly around city streets and rock out in a cramped flat. Punk lives! 

Tiny Little Piece of My Heart

Bic Runga, Music Video, 2012

For fourth album Belle (2011), Bic Runga found new collaborators, including brothers Kody and Ruban Nielson (The Mint Chicks), with Kody becoming Belle's producer and Runga’s partner. ‘Tiny Little Piece of My Heart’ was the first result, and opening track; The Herald's Lydia Jenkin called the girl group style number "an irresistible piece of pop, deceptively effortless in its spacious groove and sweet keyboard riffs". The black and white video for the jaunty song about moving on, sees Runga lolling about on a bed with a vintage camera. It was directed by fashion photographer Oliver Rose. 

Faster Hooves

Head Like A Hole, Music Video, 1994

Released on an EP ahead of their second album Flik Y’Self Off Y’Self, the promo for 'Faster Hooves' showed that while Head Like A Hole had distilled the industrial-thrash of their grimy origins into a hookier, more polished sound, the band had lost none of their piss-taking humour. With the rocky outcrops of Wellington's Island Bay filling in for the Wild West, singer Nigel 'Booga' Beazley teeters precariously on a helpless donkey, in pursuit of villainous drummer Mark 'Hidee Beast' Hamill. Meanwhile the rest of band hang on nooses next to a boiling campfire pot of Wattie's finest.

Turn from the Rain

The Veils, Music Video, 2013

With 'Turn from the Rain', The Veils added their name to the prestigious list of bands who have recorded at London's famed Abbey Road Studios — a list which includes The Beatles, Pink Floyd and Radiohead. According to frontman Finn Andrews “The room there is so musty and still … you want any sound you make to be worth disturbing the grand silence for.” The idea of making a video at Abbey Road arrived at 2am in a Hackney flat; the performances were shot on 16mm film, an appropriately retro touch considering the venue. The recordings were later released on The Abbey Road EP

Treaty

Moana and the Moahunters, Music Video, 1996

More than 20 years on, 'Treaty' remains as infectious as it does relevant, mixing haka, hip hop and funk to present a message on Māori sovereignty. Channelling the colours of the Tino Rangatiratanga flag, the video creates a fitting backdrop for lyrics delivered via the stirring vocals of Moana and the Moahunters, verses by rapper Bennett Pomana (Upper Hutt Posse, Dam Native), and elements of traditional performance. According to director Ross Cunningham, the set design was inspired by Ralph Hotere illustrations from a book of Hone Tuwhare poems.

Long White Cloud

AttitudeLive, Music Video, 2015

Made for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, this video mixes Kiwi landscapes with images of disabled athletes and performers, showing what they are capable of. The song’s lead vocalists, Natalie Te Paa and Cam Dawson, are both blind. Helping out behind the scenes are Callum Martin (The Checks), Leza Corban (Strawpeople) and ex-Split Enz members Eddie Rayner and Mike Chunn. As well as being an unofficial anthem for the Rio Olympics, the song aims to raise awareness of the 25% of New Zealanders who live with some form of disability.

Sailing Away

All of Us, Music Video, 1986

In this video billowing sails and an impressive array of mid-80s celebrities (musicians, broadcasters, sportspeople) raise their voices in patriotic fervour, to rally support for the first Kiwi challenge for the America’s Cup: “in a boat just called New Zealand”. The bid failed, but ‘Sailing Away’ set a record for the most consecutive weeks at number one by a NZ artist (nine), until the arrival of Smashproof’s ‘Brother’ in 2009. The tune — borrowed from ‘Pokarekare Ana’ — remains both as a reminder of simpler times in the America’s Cup, and an era of questionable haircuts.

Problems

Salmonella Dub, Music Video, 2002

Problems marks the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Salmonella Dub and director/animator Steve Scott (working here with co-director James Littlemore). The video features a lone wanderer stuck in a scorched earth desert. The briefcase of money he carries is useless in such a place, and despite stumbling across a detention centre and signs of civilisation (in the form of dystopian power plants and pylons) our wanderer keeps on his aimless lumber. Not even a trusty fake moustache gag can glean a laugh or stop him in his tracks. If only it were to rain...

Can't Get Enough

Supergroove, Music Video, 1994

It had to be a big ask getting all seven members of Supergroove in one shot and looking good for this video, but the result trips along with pace, great upside down special effects, and some bonus goldfish. Shot in one epic, 18 hour session, Can't Get Enough was one of the earliest Supergroove videos directed by bassist Joe Lonie, who went on to helm 50+ clips for everyone from King Kapisi to Goodshirt. In 1995 'Can't Get  Enough' was the first of a trio of Supergroove videos to take away the supreme award for Best New Zealand Music Video of the year.