Jacob Bryant

Cinematographer

Intrepid cinematographer Jacob Bryant has shot everywhere from Iraq and Afghanistan to the mean streets of Auckland (Super City). His work with leading documentary makers has been nominated for multiple screen awards. An episode of TV show Ends of the Earth shot in Afghanistan won Bryant a 2007 Qantas Award; he also shared a Documentary Edge gong for filming Finding Mercy in Zimbabwe.

Richard Turner

Director

Richard Turner’s work as a director began with poetry-based works, pioneering Māori works for television, and Squeeze (1980), New Zealand’s first gay-themed feature. Since then he has made films largely in Australia.

Lynton Diggle

Director, Camera

Lynton Diggle spent almost 25 years working as a director and cameraman for the government's National Film Unit, before launching his own company. Along the way, he filmed in Antarctica and the waters of Lake Taupō, captured major salvage operations at sea, and worked alongside legendary director David Lean (Lawrence of Arabia). Diggle passed away on 23 November 2018.

Robin Laing

Producer

Robin Laing began her long career as a producer with 1985's Mr Wrong, the first of many projects she has worked on with director Gaylene Preston. In 1993 Laing was awarded a Member of the British Empire (MBE) for services to the New Zealand film industry. 

Hilda Hayward

Film Pioneer

One of the earliest New Zealand women to work in movies, the late Hilda Hayward collaborated with her husband Rudall on four silent feature films in the 1920s. Author Deborah Shepard argues that her coverage of the 1932 Auckland riots make her New Zealand’s first known camerawoman. Hilda Hayward passed away in 1970.

Himiona Grace

Director [Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Porou]

Himiona Grace learnt about filmmaking at Wellington’s legendary Pacific Films. Former poutakawaenga (Māori liaison officer) at the Film Archive, Grace has composed music for a variety of shorts and television programmes; the longtime photographer has also won awards for his stills. In 2013 he wrote and directed his first feature film: The Pā Boys, which follows a reggae trio from Wellington on a road trip north.

Trevor Haysom

Producer

Producer Trevor Haysom has worked on projects ranging from ballroom dancing to bro'Town; a four decade screen career has seen Haysom notably produce for emerging filmmakers, including Gregor Nicholas (Rushes, Hey Paris) and the late Brad McGann (In My Father's Den, Possum). Haysom formed company T.H.E Film in 1991, and took away the inaugural SPADA Independent Producer of the Year Award in 2004.

Nigel Hutchinson

Director, Producer

With a background in film publicity in England, Nigel Hutchinson emigrated to New Zealand in 1974. After co-founding production company Motion Pictures, he went on to direct a run of award-winning TV commercials, and co-produce Kiwi movie landmark Goodbye Pork Pie. He passed away on 23 March 2017.

Merata Mita

Director, Writer, Producer [Ngāti Pikiao, Ngāi Te Rangi]

A passionate advocate for Māori creative control, director Merata Mita (1942 — 2010) chronicled landmark moments of protest and division in Aotearoa. Her work included Patu!, a documentary on the 1981 Springbok tour, and Mauri (1988), only the second feature to have a Māori woman as director. She features in documentaries Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen and Merata Mita - Making Waves.

Ronald Sinclair

Actor, Editor

Ronald Sinclair began his movie career at age 11 as Ra Hould, when he appeared in Down on the Farm (1935), a contender for New Zealand’s first feature-length drama made with sound. The following year he went to Hollywood, where MGM changed his name to Ronald Sinclair for movie Thoroughbreds Don’t Cry. After war service with the US Army he worked for more than two decades as a film editor.